“In order to mitigate negative staffing impacts on Texas healthcare systems and EMS agencies, the state of Texas will only allow personnel deploying for this emergency response to be NON-RESIDENTS of Texas only and to have not been employed by a Texas Acute Care hospital or EMS agency within 30 days.

This is mandated from the state of Texas. All healthcare workers with applicable licensure are eligible for ANY Krucial Staffing contract opportunities that are direct agreements and not directed by entities outside of the healthcare facility,” Krucial Staffing posted on Instagram.

A quick search on several travel nurse job boards will find many job postings stating that Texas is not currently accepting nurses who are residents and who work in Texas to work for FEMA or government-funded disaster contracts. Here is one such job posting. 

We reached out to Krucial Staffing for information on the mandate and instructions on how out-of-state nurses can apply. Here is their response,

We are following the mandate from the state of Texas that those healthcare personnel Krucial Staffing recruits for deployment in Texas must be non-residents of Texas and cannot have been employed by a Texas Acute Care hospital or EMS agency within 30 days.

All healthcare workers that meet this standard and have applicable licensure are eligible for any Krucial Staffing contract opportunities that are direct agreements and not directed by entities outside of the healthcare facility.

Our mission is to help the hospitals and ultimately the individuals who are suffering in their greatest time of need. If you are interested in applying with Krucial Staffing, please go to this link. 

Details

Governor Abbott passed a mandate that prohibits Texas residents who are currently employed from working for FEMA or state-funded disaster response agencies. The problem apparently lies in this sentence from his August 9, 2021 press release announcing the actions he planned to take in response to rising COVID-19 cases: “The Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) will be utilizing staffing agencies to provide medical personnel from out-of-state to Texas health care facilities to assist in COVID-19 operations.”

Apparently, that little stipulation that the medical personnel is from out-of-state has resulted in current employed Texas nurses or current travelers based in Texas being unable to work government-funded disaster response contracts if they have been employed at a hospital within the state in the past 30 days.

Texas in Dire Need of Thousand of Nurses

Texas is looking to fill 6,500 healthcare positions from out-of-state or unemployed Texas nurses to help with the COVID-19 response. Texas is dealing with a record number of ICU hospitalizations from COVID-19 and thanks to a severe shortage of nurses, the state has extended its state of emergency. 

Last Monday, Texas Governor Greg Abbott requested help from the Texas Department of State in dealing with the surge in cases. Part of that help included funding to hire travel nurses as outlined in the document titled, “Governor Abbott’s Proactive Response To The Coronavirus Threat.”

However,

Stephanie Smolders recommends saving as much as possible before starting a digital nomad lifestyle.
  • Stephanie Smolders is a marketing and business coach, writer, and digital nomad.
  • She and her partner have been traveling the world full time while working remotely since 2016.
  • If they were to start over, Smolders says they’d bulk up on savings and be more flexible with travel plans.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

It may sound idyllic to be a remote worker and log onto your computer from anywhere in the world.

It is, but after five years of working remotely as a digital nomad, there are definitely a few things I wish I’d known beforehand.

In 2016, I quit my teaching job and started traveling full-time and working remotely with my partner, Peter. Our fair share of mistakes have taught us a lot. If we were to start over again, this is what we would do differently.

1. You get what you pay for

Save yourself endless frustration and energy by not always going for the cheapest option. At first, we tried hard to save extra cash, whether on software and tools we needed for work, flights and accommodation, or even restaurant visits. We’d spend hours figuring out how to save an extra $20 a month on a software that was supposed to save us time.

In most cases, we’d discover that we needed the premium or paid plan after all, could have used that extra storage, or should have paid for a flexible flight ticket. The amount of time we spent trying to be frugal was not worth the couple hundred dollars we saved. Now, when we think we need something, we get it and save ourselves on time.

2. The lifestyle will cost more than you think

On the road, things rarely go as planned. A general rule of thumb we’ve learned is that your estimated lifestyle costs 25% more than you think and planning takes double the time. Overestimate your budget and your timing so you save yourself guilt-tripping later on. We now calculate 25% more in our budget because it’s hard to estimate your daily spending in a new country.

3. Take a break and enjoy

Doha 2017 Stephanie Smolders
Smolders in Doha, Qatar in 2017.

In the first three years, despite traveling to over 40 countries, we rarely explored or took a day off. We started a marketing company and wanted to provide the best service to our clients, so we hardly even took weekends off.

Looking back, we missed a lot of the beauty of traveling and connecting with a new country and culture. Despite the tropical locations, if you’re working as a digital nomad you’re not always on vacation, so never taking a real break will be unhealthy and unsustainable in the long run.

Now, we take at least a week-long break every three months. It keeps us motivated and productive. Even when you live in paradise, if you’re working full-time

  • Stephanie Smolders is a marketing and business coach, writer, and digital nomad.
  • She and her partner have been traveling the world full time while working remotely since 2016.
  • If they were to start over, Smolders says they’d bulk up on savings and be more flexible with travel plans.

It may sound idyllic to be a remote worker and log onto your computer from anywhere in the world.

It is, but after five years of working remotely as a digital nomad, there are definitely a few things I wish I’d known beforehand.

In 2016, I quit my teaching job and started traveling full-time and working remotely with my partner, Peter. Our fair share of mistakes have taught us a lot. If we were to start over again, this is what we would do differently.

1. You get what you pay for

Save yourself endless frustration and energy by not always going for the cheapest option. At first, we tried hard to save extra cash, whether on software and tools we needed for work, flights and accommodation, or even restaurant visits. We’d spend hours figuring out how to save an extra $20 a month on a software that was supposed to save us time. 

In most cases, we’d discover that we needed the premium or paid plan after all, could have used that extra storage, or should have paid for a flexible flight ticket. The amount of time we spent trying to be frugal was not worth the couple hundred dollars we saved. Now, when we think we need something, we get it and save ourselves on time.

2. The lifestyle will cost more than you think

On the road, things rarely go as planned. A general rule of thumb we’ve learned is that your estimated lifestyle costs 25% more than you think and planning takes double the time. Overestimate your budget and your timing so you save yourself guilt-tripping later on. We now calculate 25% more in our budget because it’s hard to estimate your daily spending in a new country. 

3. Take a break and enjoy

Doha 2017 Stephanie Smolders

Smolders in Doha, Qatar in 2017.

Courtesy of Stephanie Smolders


In the first three years, despite traveling to over 40 countries, we rarely explored or took a day off. We started a marketing company and wanted to provide the best service to our clients, so we hardly even took weekends off. 

Looking back, we missed a lot of the beauty of traveling and connecting with a new country and culture. Despite the tropical locations, if you’re working as a digital nomad you’re not  always on vacation, so never taking a real break will be unhealthy and unsustainable in the long run. 

Now, we take at least a week-long break every three months. It keeps us motivated and productive. Even when you live in paradise, if you’re working full-time you still need a few days off every couple of months to recharge. 

4. Don’t skip out on insurance  

Working remotely and

A BIT OF HISTORY

Labor Day, a day to celebrate American workers by giving them a day off, was first celebrated as national holiday in 1894.

President Grover Cleveland signed the law designating the first Monday in September as Labor Day, but Colorado was one of the holiday’s early adopters. It was the second of five states that passed laws in 1887 to establish the holiday, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

The first Labor Day celebration actually took place on Sept. 5, 1882, in New York City and was organized by the Central Labor Union. There was a parade that nearly flopped because no band had been organized for the marchers. Fortunately, the Jewelers Union of Newark Two showed up with a band and saved the day.

BEST JOBS

These are the top 10 best jobs of 2021 as reported by U.S. News and World Report.

Jobs were ranked based on their various attributes or qualities, including work-life balance, pay and stress.

Medical and health services manager

Speech-language pathologist

JOBS ON THE RISE

These are LinkedIn’s top 15 in-demand jobs for 2021. Jobs were ranked based on demand and jobs available.

Frontline Ecommerce worker

Loan and mortgage experts

Health care supporting staff

Business development and sales professionals

Experts in workplace diversity

Digital marketing professionals

Professional and personal coaches

Mental health specialists

User experience professionals

Artificial intelligence practitioners

GENDER CENTS

American women’s annual overall earnings were 82% of what men made in 2019, according to a U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics report released in December. This statistic is for women working full-time and salary workers.

Broken down by race and ethnicity

Asian women earned 77% as much as Asian men (Overall, Asian women and men earned more than women and men of any other race and ethnicity).

White women earned 81% as much as white men.

Black women earned 92% as much as Black men.

Hispanic women earned 86% as much as Hispanic men. (Overall, Hispanic women and men earned less than women and men of any other race and ethnicity.)

Among women workers age 25 and older, the median weekly earnings in 2019 for those without a high school diploma was $592, for those with a diploma it was $746 and for those with a bachelor’s degree or higher it was $1,367.

ON THE MONEY

The average hourly wage for workers in Grand Junction was $23.61 in May of 2020, according to a July 14 report released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The nationwide average hourly wage is $27.07.

Employment in Grand Junction was highly concentrated in eight of 22 occupational groups.

Those groups, along with the number of workers in that field, are shown below:

Office and Administrative Support Occupations (clerks of all kinds, tellers, administrative assistants), 8,040.

Sales and Related Occupations (retail salespersons, cashiers), 6,500.

Food Preparation and Serving Related Occupations (cooks, bartenders, wait staff), 5,780.

Health care Practitioners and Technical Occupations (nurses, physicians, pharmacists), 5,060.

Construction and Extraction

A dozen years ago, when 125 students signed up for classes at Utah’s first public online school, DeLaina Tonks dreamed of the day when 10 times that number would enroll.

She just didn’t dream it would take an infectious plague to make it happen.

As disruptive as COVID-19 has been, some things have proven impervious to its chaos.

Mountain Heights Academy, for one.

Lockdown. Sheltering in place. Social distancing. Videoconferencing. They’d already been doing that for years.

* * *

As principal of Mountain Heights Academy since its inception in 2009 — it was first called Open High School until grades seven through nine were added in 2012 — Tonks has watched a slow and steady growth as students around the state have discovered, for various reasons, that virtual school is the best fit for them.

Some are athletes or actors or dancers who take their school-in-a-laptop along with them as they travel far and wide to pursue their dreams. Others require extra emotional or physical support or assistance. Still others are what Tonks refers to as “mainstream kids who do not want to deal with swirlies in the bathroom.”

“It’s not the right fit for everyone,” she says, “but it’s the best fit for

DALLAS — A Texas nurse left her staff position at a hospital to become a traveling nurse because she was burnt out.


What You Need To Know

  • The pandemic has caused nurses to become fatigued
  • A Texas nurse says many nurses are also traumatized and overworked
  • The nurse says being a traveling nurse is much healthier for her mind and body

“I was exhausted and underappreciated,” said Rashida Holliday from Killeen.

Holliday has been a nurse for 11 years. She started as a nurse in the U.S. Army for eight years. After that, she had a full-time job at one hospital.

“But the hospitals are all full, our safety is in jeopardy, we are short-staffed and COVID is on the rise,” Holliday said.

Holliday realized there was a shortage when the workload got heavier, and she was assigned many extra duties. She said that it escalated from there.

“Nurses are burnt out, traumatized and tired from long work hours and the extra demands because of the shortage and the lack of compensation,” she said.

To think about working around COVID-19 gives her anxiety. 

“At night, I can still hear the beeping of the machines. I had guilt about calling in sick. There was no compassion for our mental health in an industry with so much compassion,” Holliday explained.

Holliday quit and became a traveling nurse with the company StaffDNA.

“This is my first time not working with COVID patients in a long time. I requested a non-COVID ward because I’m so burnt out,” she said.

Holliday has worked at five hospitals since the pandemic, including in Tyler, Texas, Richmond, Virginia, Saint Louis, Missouri, Gallup, New Mexico with the Navajo Nation and her current posting in Plano, Texas, north of Dallas.

“This company listens to me, pays well and makes sure my environment is safe,” she said. “I’m actually getting compensated for the demands of working during a pandemic in a shortage.”

Across Texas and the country, demand for traveling nurses through StaffDNA’s technology is on the rise.

The table below shows the increase of jobs by market and overall for the state of Texas by month.
The total at the bottom is looking at the increase in jobs from June 1, 2021, to August 25, 2021.

 

DFW

San Antonio

Austin

Texas

June

43%

-58%

100%

15%

July

109%

415%

143%

67%

August (to date)

24%

99%

47%

41%

Total from June to August

277%

369%

1133%

191%

Holliday said she now realizes how important it is to recharge.

“I hang out with friends, I play my base guitar, and I always try and get outdoors,” Holliday said.

She believes that nurses need to stand up for themselves and their mental health right now.

“Nurses should come together to speak out and ask for support,” she said. “If there was better patient ratios, higher pay and support, retention wouldn’t be an issue.”

She said this is the time for nurses to come together and speak up to give safe patient care.

This guide is for British citizens travelling for business or other work purposes. It explains what employers, employees, or the self-employed need to do if they need a visa or permit.

Entry requirements

If you’re going to Croatia to work (or any other EU country, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein) you must make sure you meet passport and other travel requirements.

On the day you travel, you’ll need your passport to both:

  • have at least 6 months left
  • be less than 10 years old (even if it has 6 months or more left)

If you’re travelling for business for up to 90 days in a 180-day period, you may be able to do some work-related things without needing a visa or work permit, such as attend business meetings. These are usually covered by the Schengen visa waiver.

Although Croatia isn’t in the Schengen area it still applies the 90-day rule, but it applies it differently.

If you’re going for other types of work you may need a visa, work permit or residence permit.

Croatia’s authorities are responsible for setting and enforcing entry rules. They decide which activities need a visa or permit, or which may be exempt.

You must always check with Croatia’s government before you travel, to make sure you meet their legal requirements.

If you’re working in more than one country you’ll need to check the entry rules of each country.

If you need a passport, visa or permit, you should apply well in advance of travel.

Visa and permit documents

This guide explains the general application process for some of the visa or permit types available in Croatia. It includes a checklist of documents that you’ll usually need to include when applying.

It may not cover all scenarios so you must always check the exact application process and document requirements with Croatia’s authorities or embassy.

You must also check what format the documents should be presented in, including if they must be:

  • translated
  • ‘legalised’ (apostillised) or notarised
  • originals, or if copies are acceptable
  • signed in ink (a wet signature), or if they can be signed electronically (an e-signature)
  • dated within a certain period of time, such as 30 days before you submit your application

Countries often use the terms visa, work permit and residence permit differently. For example, some may refer to a work permit as a visa. This guide uses the same terms used in Croatia, so you know which ones to use when speaking to Croatia’s authorities.

Check if you need a visa or permit

Croatia is not in the Schengen area.

The Schengen area countries apply the 90-day visa waiver rule as a group. This means if you visit one or more of the Schengen area countries within a 180 day-period, it all counts towards the Schengen 90-day limit.

Croatia applies a separate 90-day limit. It doesn’t apply the 90 days as a group within the Schengen area countries.

This means you can spend up to 90 days in a 180-day period in other

The Morrison Government will make support available to fund assistance for job seekers across the country to get a driver’s licence in a move that will help address a significant barrier to many entering the workforce.

Job seekers participating in employment services through a jobactive provider will be eligible to access increased support for driving lessons to help them complete the required hours to get their driver’s licence. In addition to the increased assistance for driving lessons, jobactive employment services providers can also support job seekers with other travel costs such as public transport and fuel.

With nearly one third of job seekers on the jobactive caseload indicating they do not currently hold a driver’s licence, around 330,000 individuals may be eligible for the support nationally.

Minister for Employment, Workforce, Skills, Small and Family Business, Stuart Robert said the assistance would be particularly helpful for people living in outer-suburban and regional areas who need to travel greater distances to get to their place of employment or training.

‘A critical part of succeeding at an interview or at a new job is being able to travel to and from work easily— which is why I have directed this change to ensure job seekers are able to more easily travel safely to training, interviews or to start a new job or apprenticeship,’ he said.

‘As we continue to suppress the virus, getting as many Australians into work as possible is critical to securing our economic recovery, and helping job seekers get a driver’s licence will increase their independence and mobility as well as boosting their prospects for getting into work.

‘Our jobs plan, outlined in the recent Budget, is to connect people with jobs today and upskill our workforce for the jobs of tomorrow—today’s change contributes to the Morrison Government’s plan to get all Australians who should be working into a job.’

Driving lessons in Australia can be cost prohibitive for many Australians generally costing between $55 and $70 an hour. Driver’s licence fees vary by state and by licence level. This change supports all Australians, regardless of where they live.

For more information on the range of support available to job seekers, visit: www.jobsearch.gov.au

SAGNAW, MI — Mid-Michigan employers have thousands of open positions, including remote work opportunities, but job candidates are in short supply.

From employment fairs to an in-depth look at the labor shortage and workers’ child care woes, here are some recent headlines you might have missed:

Morley Companies Inc.

Morley Companies Inc. is hosting a job fair Wednesday, June 12, 2019, at 4075 Bay Road in Saginaw Township.Andrew Whitaker | MLive.com file

Saginaw’s Morley hiring up to 1,100 people, including remote workers

Morley, one of Saginaw County’s largest employers, aims to fill 500 open positions now and hire up to 600 more through the end of October.

In a news release, company officials said “new and expanded business engagements are causing Morley to experience a surge in employment opportunities serving its Fortune 500 clientele.”

The majority of these jobs are based in the Great Lakes Bay Region and include remote work opportunities, the release states. The company also offers flexible scheduling and entry-level positions that pay as much as $16 per hour.

Morley has open positions in a number of service areas, including administrative support, document clerks, automotive technical support and talent acquisition. Many of these positions offer the ability to work in person or remotely.

Flexible scheduling is also available, including the option to work part time, full time, second shift, or four 10-hour days instead of the traditional five eight-hour days, according to company officials.

A virtual hiring event is scheduled to take place Thursday, Sept. 2, and another is being planned for Friday, Sept. 17.

Read the full story here.

Santa at Bronner's

Santa Claus won’t be visiting Bronner’s Christmas Wonderland in Frankenmuth this holiday season because of the COVID-19 pandemic, but children can still catch a glimpse of Kris Kringle, virtually.Kaytie Boomer | MLive.com file

Bronner’s wants you to work where it’s Christmas every day

Dec. 25 is months away, but if you’re already counting down the days until Christmas, Bronner’s may have just the job for you.

Bronner’s Christmas Wonderland, a Frankenmuth landmark and the world’s largest Christmas store, is hosting a job fair from noon to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 8.

Bronner’s is hiring for a variety of part-time, seasonal positions including sales clerks, cashiers/packers, customer service, catalog operators, catalog fulfillment, embroidery machine operators, carts and baskets, ornament lettering and snack area. Job seekers should come through the store’s south entrance and go to the program center in section two for on-the-spot interviews during the job fair.

“We’re looking for employees who can commit to Bronner’s through Dec. 31,” Crissy Dutcher, salesroom and catalog/internet fulfillment personnel manager, said in a statement.

Read the full story here.

Chemical leak contained at  HSC

An aerial view of Hemlock Semiconductor.

Hemlock Semiconductor will hire temporary workers full time, nearly doubling its workforce

Beginning in January, polysilicon maker Hemlock Semiconductor, will transition temporary workers to full-time staff and assume direct operational control of polysilicon finishing operations at its Saginaw County facility.

Company leaders announced the plan in a news release. They said consumer demand is growing

Luke Brokaw lives in a school bus, and he does it by choice. The 36-year-old left Michigan three years ago and set out West. Landing in San Diego, he worked as a delivery driver for Amazon. But he wanted even more freedom, so he started freelancing as a graphic and web designer — and roaming.

When I reach him, he’s outside Zion National Park, using his cellphone as a hot spot. “There’s so much red,” he says of the bluffs and canyons around him. “Everything is red.” Living on the road, he says, “does get stressful from time to time. But it’s still a lot better than working a nine-to-five somewhere.”

After buying his “skoolie” in 2018, he built it out, putting in a full kitchen and solar panels. It was painted like an American flag. He painted it black — a choice he later came to regret. “When I parked in residential areas, it looked creepy,” he says. So he repainted it teal and added a landscape of mountains, trees and a sunset. Now random strangers knock on the door, saying they recognize the bus from his YouTube channel. He goes by “The Digital Nomad Guy” on Instagram and sometimes wraps his long red beard in rubber bands.

Luke Brokaw takes a break from driving near La Verkin, Utah.
Provided by Luke Brokaw

Millions have embraced this lifestyle since the advent of COVID-19. As companies responded to the pandemic by making office jobs remote, they also untethered their employees from geographic limitations, at a time when housing costs are skyrocketing. According to a report from MBO Partners, a company that recruits independent professionals to do contract work for businesses, 7.3 million Americans described themselves as “digital nomads” in 2019; a year later, that number increased by half.

Digital nomads have become a common sight across the West, especially in small towns near national parks or ski resorts, where they rely on a hot spot or cafe Wi-Fi to get through the workday, then explore the outdoors once 5 o’clock hits. They’re part of a growing class of transient professionals who use the internet to work remotely and travel at the same time, eschewing traditional roots and responsibilities. But that kind of freedom does not come without a cost, or an impact on the places they visit.

Culturally, they occupy a space between “Zoom Town” movers (similarly remote professionals who’ve resettled in smaller or cheaper towns) and #vanlifers (wealthy hobbyists who might sink $100,000 into a decked-out Mercedes-Benz Sprinter van and retire early.) A quick Instagram search reveals millions of images tagged #vanlife or #digitalnomad, showcasing customized vehicles replete with light wood cabinetry and string lights. The glamorous images can be unnerving in a time when many are living in their vehicles out of economic desperation, with ingenious modifications made out of necessity. Each group adapts in its own way.

Luke Brokaw looks out over the Hoover Dam near Kingman Wash, Arizona.
Provided by Luke Brokaw

Aside from the mode