It’s easier to rest when you feel safe.

While the vast majority of hotels and vacation rentals are safe, occasionally a story will surface about a guest discovering they’ve been secretly filmed by hidden cameras. Fortunately, a recent viral video shows people how to spot possible recording devices.

The video was uploaded to TikTok by Marcus Hutchins, using the screen name Malwaretech. Since last week, it has garnered more than 15 million views.

The advice is actually quite simple.

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The first step, according to the video, is to check around the room for any devices that have been placed in areas where it could possibly record something. In the video, the example used is a smoke detector placed directly over the bed. An alarm clock could also be pointed at the bed.

The next step involves physically checking the devices for cameras. In the video, several objects in the room have been fitted with tiny spy cameras to show off how small these items can be. At one point, the footage reveals that a hidden camera has been placed in a USB outlet brick.

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Cameras can be detected by simply shining a light on the device. A camera lens will reflect blue, for example, when placed directly under a flashlight. A light can also be used to reveal cameras hidden behind mirrored edges (such as the front of an alarm clock or even a possible double-sided mirror).

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Another way someone staying in a room can find hidden cameras is to look for IR sensors on devices, which may show that a camera with night vision is in the device. Guests can also purchase RF (radio frequency) detecting devices to pick up any signals that devices may be broadcasting. 

A TikTok video went viral of a woman sneaking an extra bag onto an airplane in this hilarious hack.

TikTok user @miniadvantures aka Ashlin posted a video of herself hiding a drawstring bag under her sweatshirt to fake a pregnant belly in order to avoid paying a fee for too many carry-ons.

Using the popular “Nobody’s Gonna Know” audio, Ashlin wrote on the video, “When you get a $44 flight but can only bring a backpack.”

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She then shows herself boarding the flight, writing, “It worked.”

In a follow-up video, the TikToker informs viewers that her illusion worked so well, she was able to pre-board the flight as a “pregnant” person.

The original video has gathered 13.2 million views and 2.7 million likes.

Some questioned how she got through TSA, or what would happen if she wanted to take off her sweater, but most viewers thought Ashlin’s hack was “genius” and let her know in the comments.

One viewer wrote, “Saving this for next time I fly!”

Ashlin’s travel hack could help some women take advantage of cheap flights before prices rise as the pandemic comes to an end, allowing for more travel.

In March, when President Biden announced that all American adults would be eligible for the vaccine by May, searches for summer travel rose 27% each week, according to Kayak data.

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TSA says the number of passengers screened at US airports in early July has been around pre-pandemic levels.

JPMorgan airline analyst Jamie Baker told CNBC that “domestic airfares are rising.”

“While discounts can still be found, they’re no longer falling into consumers’ laps,” Baker added. “Discounted fares increasingly require a hunt, and for many consumers that have been locked up for a year, they’re probably not up to the effort.”

As travel returns more and more, TikTok users are sharing horror stories along with hacks. The popular Walker Twins recently had a viral video of their “travel hack,” which got mixed reviews.

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The video, which has 4.9 million views, shows a Walker bro sitting on an airplane while an unseen passenger behind him places their bare foot on the armrest of his window seat.

Then the perturbed videographer decides to pour water from a Dasani bottle over the encroaching toes, prompting his inconsiderate neighbor to take their tootsies out of his space.

This story first appeared in the New York Post. 

An advert for a nanny with an annual salary of $100,000 (£72,000) has gone viral on social media for its job description and pay packet.

A private staffing firm recently posted the role to Indeed for a family based in San Francisco — but with travel for “approximately ten weeks per year” at a number of residences.

As first reported by The Bold Italic on Monday, the nanny role went viral for the $100,000 annual salary and a list of requirements for potential applicants, including a bachelor’s degree.

The applicants also required at least three years of experience and for the nanny to be “’professional, experienced and educated”.

The nanny, who forms part of a team of three nannies for the unnamed family, would be caring for a toddler and baby across seven days of the week.

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“Don’t get us wrong, people who watch and teach children for a living deserve that much money (hello, teachers),” the Bold Italic wrote, “but the fact that they are spending upwards of $300,000 (£219,000) on private childcare blew our minds.”

Although the pay for the nanny role is substantial, applicants would also be asked to assist with homework and prepare “fresh and healthy meals,” as well as washing dishes, among other tasks.

A confidentiality agreement is also asked for, and the post has ceased taking applications on Indeed.

“We know caregivers are often underpaid, undervalued and underinsured. But even by San Francisco standards, a nanny care team to watch two kids is a bit over the top,” wrote one social media user of the advert.

It is not the first time a nanny role has attracted online attention for its job description or pay, following an advert for a Silicon Valley-based family last year.

The advert went viral on social media for asking for a bachelor’s degree and a willingness to “to learn about using alternatives to milk and butter,” as SFist reported.

Applicants, who were offered a wage of roughly $40 (£29) an hour, were also required to do “sit-ups, lunges, squats, pushups” with a child aged 10, and plan family vacations on Excel.