In June alone, 3.9 million Americans quit their jobs to pursue something new. The phenomenon is being called “The Great Resignation.”

Recent data from the US Department of Labor shows more Americans are quitting their jobs amid the pandemic. 

Another 3.9 million people in June alone quit in what is being called ‘The Great Resignation.’ 

Alisa Cohen is a partner at the firm Close Cohen Career Consulting and said the unprecedented job market is making people question their careers and offering them more choices. 

“So people are saying, ‘hey, do I really need to commute five days a week? Do I really need to live in a certain location, can I be closer to my family or live somewhere more affordable?'” said Cohen, who has seen an increase in clients looking to change not just their job but also their careers. 

RELATED: Download KING 5’s Roku and Amazon Fire apps to watch live newscasts and video on demand

It seems almost counterintuitive for someone to leave their job in a time of uncertainty, but for Seattle-native Kelly Le, it was the flexibility to work from home and pay increase that were key factors in her decision.

After four years in New York for college, Le landed her dream job working in media and didn’t have plans to move back to Seattle until later in life when she settled down.

But when the pandemic hit, she says her priorities shifted. 

“Family, flexibility and quality of life was something I found to be a lot more important instead of hustling and grinding and having that rat race,” said Le. 

That flexibility allowed her the time to take real estate classes in hopes of someday pursuing that career as a side job. 

“I don’t think I could have done that going into an office every day,” said Le. 

Le can work from anywhere as long as she reaches a certain number of hours worked and she stays efficient and productive. 

“I love to travel, so you can still have your laptop and be in San Francisco, San Diego or Miami, and I love that,” said Le adding, “I also had a slight pay increase so that made my decision easier.”

For people looking to change their jobs in favor of flexibility, Cohen advises to first look at your current job. 

“See what is working for you, what aspects of your job do you want to keep and what is it that you’re seeking. And then it’s a good idea to talk with recruiters about your options,” Cohen said.

The State Department updated its travel warning system to sync with the CDC’s.

The State Department has updated its travel warnings to better reflect the advice from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it said, meaning that as of Tuesday, approximately 80% of countries are now a “Level 4: Do Not Travel” on its advisory.

“In light of those risks, the Department of State strongly recommends U.S. citizens reconsider all travel abroad,” it said in a new notice Monday.

Last year, the department issued a blanket “Level 4: Do Not Travel” advisory, the first of its kind, to urge Americans not to travel overseas as the coronavirus swept around the world. The notice was lifted last August, as the department instead instituted individual notices for every country again, reflecting the local risks from the pandemic and other threats, like terrorism, crime or unrest.

Several countries, such as India, are seeing enormous spikes in cases of COVID-19, and the World Health Organization has reported that the average number of cases reported daily worldwide is now higher than it has ever been.

But the State Department’s new advisories are not because there are spikes in the majority of these countries, it said, but rather an “adjustment” to using the “CDC’s existing epidemiological assessments” in each country individually.

Prior to the announcement, just over 16% of countries had a “Level 4: Do Not Travel” warning from the State Department, and most of those were for extreme threats — ongoing conflict like in Afghanistan or Iraq, bloody unrest like in Myanmar or Haiti, and dangerous regimes like in North Korea or Iran.

Like the State Department, the CDC has a four-tier system — launched in November — that rates the level of COVID-19 cases from low, at Level 1, to very high, at Level 4. Those levels are determined using the number of cases on a per capita basis and the direction of infection rates.

With mounting cases and new variants, the CDC is urging even vaccinated travelers to be cautious.

“Because of the current situation in India even fully vaccinated travelers may be at risk for getting and spreading COVID-19 variants and should avoid all travel to India,” it said in its new notice for India late Monday — standard language for all countries at its highest-level warning.

All travelers, including U.S. citizens,

The U.S. Department of State will add a slew of countries to its “Do Not Travel List” later this week because of coronavirus danger.

Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images


The U.S. Department of State will add a slew of countries to its “Do Not Travel List” later this week because of coronavirus danger.

Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. State Department on Monday announced plans to expand travel advisories, urging U.S. citizens to stay home as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to pose “unprecedented risks” around the globe.

The updated travel guidelines are intended to curb visits “to approximately 80% of countries worldwide” that are experiencing dramatic spikes in cases, the department said in a statement. New guidance is expected be released later this week.

The latest recommendations come as the coronavirus “continues to pose unprecedented risks to travelers,” and the new guidelines “better reflect the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s science-based Travel Health Notices,” according to the notice.

The State Department added: “As always, we are closely monitoring conditions around the globe, and will regularly update our destination-specific advice to U.S. travelers as conditions evolve.”

As of Monday afternoon, the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center reported 141,786,586 COVID-19 cases around the world. The United States has confirmed more cases than any other country in the world — 31,733,400 with India, Brazil, France, Russia, the United Kingdom, Turkey, Italy, Spain and Germany rounding out the top 10 spots. Meanwhile, global deaths have surpassed 3 million, according to the latest data.

French President Emmanuel Macron in March extended a nationwide lockdown through the end of April, citing new, faster-spreading variants of the coronavirus. He called it “an epidemic within the epidemic.”

As NPR reported, “In Brazil, deaths have topped 3,000 per day as the country is ravaged by the virus. Mexico has recorded more than 211,000 deaths. India has had more than 175,000 deaths and deaths in the United Kingdom have topped 127,000.”

The U.S. Department of State will add a slew of countries to its “Do Not Travel List” later this week because of coronavirus danger.

Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images


The U.S. Department of State will add a slew of countries to its “Do Not Travel List” later this week because of coronavirus danger.

Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. State Department on Monday announced plans to expand travel advisories, urging U.S. citizens to stay home as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to pose “unprecedented risks” around the globe.

The updated travel guidelines are intended to curb visits “to approximately 80% of countries worldwide” which are currently experiencing dramatic spikes in cases, the department said in a statement. New guidance is expected be released later this week.

The latest recommendations come as the coronavirus “continues to pose unprecedented risks to travelers,” and the new guidelines “better reflect the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s science-based Travel Health Notices,” according to the notice.

The State Department added: “As always, we are closely monitoring conditions around the globe, and will regularly update our destination-specific advice to U.S. travelers as conditions evolve.”

As of Monday afternoon, the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center reported 141,786,586 COVID-19 cases around the world. The United States has confirmed more cases than any other country in the world — 31,733,400 with India, Brazil, France, Russia, the United Kingdom, Turkey, Italy, Spain and Germany rounding out the top 10 spots. Meanwhile, global deaths have surpassed 3 million, according to the latest data.

French President Emmanuel Macron in March extended a nationwide lockdown through the end of April, citing new, faster-spreading variants of the coronavirus. He called it “an epidemic within the epidemic.”

As NPR reported, “In Brazil, deaths have topped 3,000 per day as the country is ravaged by the virus. Mexico has recorded more than 211,000 deaths. India has had more than 175,000 deaths and deaths in the United Kingdom have topped 127,000.”