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The New Zealand government has announced quarantine-free travel from Tasmania can resume from Sunday July 4th at 4pm. Passengers entering New Zealand will need to return a negative COVID test result no more than 72 hours before their scheduled departure time. This is only required if you have been in Australia for more than 72 hours. Tests and result certificates for travel clearance can be provided by North West Pathology, Launceston Pathology and Hobart Pathology. Previously, flights were paused following the worsening of COVID-19 outbreaks around Australia. ACT, South Australia and Victoria will also be included in the Trans-Tasman travel bubble. If you are in Tasmania and experience any cold or flu systems, contact the Public Health Hotline for advice or to arrange a test. For updates on high-risk locations, check the Tasmanian coronavirus website.

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New Zealand has extended its suspension of quarantine-free travel until midnight on Sunday, when it will restore regular travel links with New South Wales.

The country enacted the travel pause on Thursday in response to two new community cases of Covid-19 in Sydney.

NSW health officials still have not identified the missing link between the positive tests and quarantine, however New Zealand’s Covid-19 minister, Chris Hipkins, is satisfied the risk to Kiwis has dissipated.

“There has been close liaison between the health agencies,” he said.

Hipkins said the NSW risk assessment was that “the two community cases in Sydney are contained and that there is no evidence of widespread undetected community transmission”.

New Zealand’s travel ban to the entire state was in stark contrast to other Australian states, which largely chose only to ban travellers who had visited exposure sites.

The country’s health authorities have not explained their overzealous approach, which saw NSW citizens hundreds of kilometres away from Sydney banned from travel.

New Zealand’s Covid-19 website was also slow to reflect this decision, meaning northern NSW citizens who attempted to fly to NZ from the Gold Coast and Brisbane were upset when they were turned away.

Contact tracers contacted 5,477 people who arrived in NZ from NSW in the past week, urging them to monitor their symptoms.

One person, identified by NZ Health, was asked to quarantine after visiting an exposure site. That person had since returned a negative test from their stay in managed isolation.

NSW again diagnosed no new locally transmitted cases from more than 22,000 tests in the 24 hours to 8pm on Friday but authorities issued an alert for customers who visited Double Bay Woolworths.

Anyone who attended the store between 10.45am and 11.00am on Monday, 3 May must get tested immediately and isolate until a negative result is received.

Sydneysiders were being urged to wear masks and adhere to other restrictions without cancelling their Mother’s Day plans.

The restrictions – which extend to the Blue Mountains, the Central Coast and the Illawarra – would remain in place until at least the end of the weekend. They include compulsory masks on public transport and a 20-person cap on indoor gatherings.

But the premier, Gladys Berejiklian, did not want the curbs to suppress Sydneysiders’ spirits, encouraging residents to keep their Mother’s Day bookings for Sunday and continue supporting local businesses.

Liquor and Gaming NSW was urging businesses to do the right thing over the weekend too. Compliance officers would be out in force across the state, checking venues were Covid-safe.

Businesses can be fined up to $5,000 and forced to shut their doors for defying Covid rules, including the requirement all patrons check in.

“Now is not the time to get complacent, the Covid safety requirements are in place for a reason, and all venues need to make sure they are fully compliant,” the director of compliance, Dimitri Argeres, said.

Officers would also be checking those participating in the NSW government’s Dine & Discover voucher program

LOS ANGELES — An Oscars unlike any before will get underway Sunday night, with history on the line in major categories and a telecast retooled for the pandemic.

The 93rd Academy Awards will begin at 8 p.m. EDT on ABC. There will be no host, no audience, nor face masks for nominees attending the ceremony at Los Angeles’ Union Station – this year’s hub for a show usually broadcast from the Dolby Theatre. In contrast with the largely virtual Golden Globes, Zoom boxes have been closed out – though numerous international hubs and satellite feeds will connect nominees unable to travel.

Show producers are hoping to return some of the traditional glamor to the Oscars, even in a pandemic year. The red carpet is back, though not the throngs; only a handful of media outlets will be allowed on site. (E! red carpet coverage starts at 3 p.m.) Casual wear is a no-no. The pre-show on ABC begins at 6:30 p.m. EDT and will include pre-taped performances of the five Oscar-nominated songs. The ceremony is available to stream on Hulu Live TV, YouTubeTV, AT&T TV, FuboTV and on ABC.com with provider authentication.

Pulling the musical interludes (though not the in memoriam segment) from the three-hour broadcast – and drastically cutting down the time it will take winners to reach the podium – will free up a lot of time in the ceremony. And producers, led by filmmaker Steven Soderbergh, are promising a reinvented telecast.

2021 Oscars: Date, nominees, how to watch, more for Academy Awards on ABC

The Oscars will look more like a movie, Soderbergh has said. The show will be shot in 24 frames-per-second (as opposed to 30), appear more widescreen and the presenters – including Brad Pitt, Halle Berry, Reese Witherspoon, Harrison Ford, Rita Moreno and Zendaya – are considered “cast members.” The telecast’s first 90 seconds, Soderbergh has claimed, will “announce our intention immediately.”

Gone will be the large crowds and throngs of press — with only nominees, their guests, presenters and a handful of media in attendance.

But even a great show may not be enough to save the Oscars from an expected ratings slide. Award show ratings have cratered during the pandemic, and this year’s nominees – many of them smaller, lower-budget dramas – won’t come close to the drawing power of past Oscar heavyweights like “Titanic” or “Black Panther.” Last year’s Oscars, when Bong Joon Ho’s “Parasite” became the first non-English language film to win best picture, was watched by 23.6 million, an all-time low.

Netflix dominated this year with 35 nominations, including the lead-nominee “Mank,” David Fincher’s black-and-white drama about “Citizen Kane” co-writer Herman J. Mankiewicz. The streamer is still pursuing its first best-picture win; this year, its best shot may be Aaron Sorkin’s “The Trial of the Chicago 7.”

But the night’s top prize, best picture, is widely expected to go to Chloé Zhao’s “Nomadland,” a contemplative character study about an itinerant woman (Frances McDormand) in the American West. Should it

An Oscars unlike any before will get underway Sunday night, with history on the line in major categories and a telecast retooled for the pandemic.

The 93rd Academy Awards will begin at 8 p.m. EDT on ABC. There will be no host, no audience, nor face masks for nominees attending the ceremony at Los Angeles’ Union Station — this year’s hub for a show usually broadcast from the Dolby Theatre. In contrast with the largely virtual Golden Globes, Zoom boxes have been closed out — though numerous international hubs and satellite feeds will connect nominees unable to travel.

Show producers are hoping to return some of the traditional glamor to the Oscars, even in a pandemic year. The red carpet is back, though not the throngs; only a handful of media outlets will be allowed on site. (E! red carpet coverage starts at 3 p.m.) Casual wear is a no-no. The pre-show on ABC begins at 6:30 p.m. EDT and will include pre-taped performances of the five Oscar-nominated songs. The ceremony is available to stream on Hulu Live TV, YouTubeTV, AT&T TV, FuboTV and on ABC.com with provider authentication.

Pulling the musical interludes (though not the in memoriam segment) from the three-hour broadcast — and drastically cutting down the time it will take winners to reach the podium — will free up a lot of time in the ceremony. And producers, led by filmmaker Steven Soderbergh, are promising a reinvented telecast.

The Oscars will look more like a movie, Soderbergh has said. The show will be shot in 24 frames-per-second (as opposed to 30), appear more widescreen and the presenters — including Brad Pitt, Halle Berry, Reese Witherspoon, Harrison Ford, Rita Moreno and Zendaya — are considered “cast members.” The telecast’s first 90 seconds, Soderbergh has claimed, will “announce our intention immediately.”

But even a great show may not be enough to save the Oscars from an expected ratings slide. Award show ratings have cratered during the pandemic, and this year’s nominees — many of them smaller, lower-budget dramas — won’t come close to the drawing power of past Oscar heavyweights like “Titanic” or “Black Panther.” Last year’s Oscars, when Bong Joon Ho’s “Parasite” became the first non-English language film to win best picture, was watched by 23.6 million, an all-time low.

Netflix dominated this year with 36 nominations, including the lead-nominee “Mank,” David Fincher’s black-and-white drama about “Citizen Kane” co-writer Herman J. Mankiewicz. The streamer is still pursuing its first best-picture win; this year, its best shot may be Aaron Sorkin’s “The Trial of the Chicago 7.”

But the night’s top prize, best picture, is widely expected to go to Chloé Zhao’s “Nomadland,” a contemplative character study about an itinerant woman (Frances McDormand) in the American West. Should it be victorious, it will be one of the lowest budget best-picture winners ever. Zhao’s film, populated by nonprofessional actors, was made for less than $5 million. (Her next film, Marvel’s “Eternals,” has a budget of at least $200 million.)

Zhao