That being said, history is unlikely to repeat itself with the Singapore-Germany travel bubble, owing to the advancement of Singapore’s and Germany’s Covid-19 vaccination rate, at 74 per cent and 58 per cent of each country’s population. This travel bubble will allow travellers from both countries to enjoy leisure travel without needing quarantine or stay-home notice (SHN).


If you’re reading this, you’ve probably completed your course of (vaccine, not tequila) shots, and you’re probably bored of taking the same old staycations or daycations. It’s time to relive the thrill of takeoff, the appreciation for different scenery and people!


When will Singapore & Germany’s travel bubble commence?


The Singapore-Germany travel bubble, or Vaccinated Travel Lane (VTL), will start on Sept 8, 2021, according to a SafeTravel news release from ICA. This means Singapore citizens and permanent residents (PRs) can just fly to and from Germany without having to quarantine or serve SHN in either country from that date onwards.


Who is allowed to travel between Singapore & Germany’s travel bubble?


Under the VTL, Singapore citizens and PRs will be able to travel unrestricted between both countries. This means that you do not have to quarantine, serve SHN or follow a restricted itinerary.


Germany has been allowing Singapore citizens and PRs unrestricted entry since June 25, 2021, and now Singapore is simply doing the same.


There are a few caveats though. If you’re not a Singapore citizen or PR but you’ve completed your vaccination course, and you’re travelling to Germany, you will need to apply for a Vaccinated Travel Pass (VTP). Applications open on Sept 1, 2021. 


What are the requirements to travel between Singapore & Germany?


Here is a summary of what you need to travel to Germany as a Singaporean or PR:


1. Preparing for your trip


Before you fly, you’ll need to be in Singapore for the past 21 days. Not an issue since borders are closed.


Check for travel requirements into Germany here. You are considered vaccinated only if you have one of Germany’s accepted vaccines: only Pfizer, Moderna and AstraZeneca are accepted. More info here.


Do not rely on your TraceTogether app to get you through Germany’s border control! Print or save PDF your vaccine certificate from National Immunisation Registry or HealthHub App. 


Your Covid-19 vaccine certificate should include the following details:


  • Particulars of the person vaccinated
  • Date & number of vaccinations
  • Name of vaccine used
  • Seal of authentication 


2. Booking your flights


You will need to book a designated VTL flight from Singapore Airlines or Lufthansa.


Your flight to Germany can be any direct flight. If you book a transit flight, then you will void the 21 consecutive days in Singapore or Germany requirement.


Whenever I hear the word “travel bubble”, I can’t help but to get a tiny bit triggered because of the unspoken jinx that befell the Singapore-Hong Kong travel bubble, causing it to close within two weeks after its launch.

That being said, history is unlikely to repeat itself with the Singapore-Germany travel bubble, owing to the advancement of Singapore’s and Germany’s COVID-19 vaccination rate, at 74% and 58% of each country’s population. This travel bubble will allow travellers from both countries to enjoy leisure travel without needing quarantine or stay-home notice (SHN).

If you’re reading this, you’ve probably completed your course of (vaccine, not tequila) shots, and you’re probably bored of taking the same old staycations or daycations. It’s time to relive the thrill of takeoff, the appreciation for different scenery and people!

When will Singapore & Germany’s travel bubble commence?

The Singapore-Germany travel bubble, or Vaccinated Travel Lane (VTL), will start on 8 September 2021, according to a SafeTravel news release from ICA. This means Singapore citizens and permanent residents (PRs) can just fly to and from Germany without having to quarantine or serve SHN in either country from that date onwards.

Who is allowed to travel between Singapore & Germany’s travel bubble?

Under the VTL, Singapore citizens and PRs will be able to travel unrestricted between both countries. This means that you do not have to quarantine, serve SHN or follow a restricted itinerary.

Germany has been allowing Singapore citizens and PRs unrestricted entry since 25 June 2021, and now Singapore is simply doing the same.

There are a few caveats though. If you’re not a Singapore citizen or PR but you’ve completed your vaccination course, and you’re travelling to Germany, you will need to apply for a Vaccinated Travel Pass (VTP). Applications open on 1 September 2021.

What are the requirements to travel between Singapore & Germany?

Here is a summary of what you need to travel to Germany as a Singaporean or PR:

1. Preparing for your trip

Before you fly, you’ll need to be in Singapore for the past 21 days. Not an issue since borders are closed.

Check for travel requirements into Germany here. You are considered vaccinated only if you have one of Germany’s accepted vaccines: only Pfizer, Moderna and AstraZeneca are accepted. More info here.

Do not rely on your TraceTogether app to get you through Germany’s border control! Print or save PDF your vaccine certificate from National Immunisation Registry or HealthHub App.

Your COVID-19 vaccine certificate should include the following details:

2. Booking your flights

You will need to book a designated VTL flight from Singapore Airlines or Lufthansa.

Your flight to Germany can be any direct flight. If you book a transit flight, then you will void the 21 consecutive days in Singapore or Germany requirement.

Your return flight to Singapore needs to be a designated VTL flight with the following flight numbers:

At time of writing, return trips

(CNN) — “Are we following the data? It appears not,” read the subject line of the marketing email that landed in inboxes this month.

“How many Border Force officials does it take to process a fully immunized British subject returning from a country with no worse infection rates than the UK? Just the same as an unvaccinated passenger coming in from almost anywhere,” it continued.

It then included a table of Covid-19 caseloads and vaccination rates for five countries — Malta, USA, Canada, Portugal and Spain — all of which showed lower case rates than the UK.

It reads like an angry blog post; but this was a marketing email to customers of Trailfinders, one of the UK’s largest travel agents.

Following the rant, the email went on to trumpet the company’s award-winning service and “unrivaled financial protection and support,” and listed their latest offers.

The email — sent June 9 and written by Trailfinders’ owner, Mike Gooley, was perhaps the most public reaction of the travel industry’s anger against the UK government’s Covid-19 travel restrictions.

Having spent months drawing up a “traffic light system” to grade countries red, amber or green by risk level, and imposing testing and quarantine regulations to match, the government launched the regulations on May 7, but appeared to make a U-turn in its first update to the scheme less than a month later.

On June 3, destinations such as Malta, Greece and Grenada were widely expected to turn green — meaning anyone arriving from those places would avoid quarantine.

But instead, the government didn’t add a single country to the green list. And they went further, downgrading Portugal — the UK’s only real tourist destination on the green list — to the amber list, meaning passengers traveling from there must now quarantine for 10 days at home.

That wasn’t supposed to happen, either; green countries on the turn towards amber were supposed to first be added to a “green watch list,” giving adequate warning that a destination might be able to change color — to “give passengers more certainty,” it was announced at the time.

Instead, the government “started to tear up the rule book at the first opportunity,” says Simon McNamara, country manager for the UK and Ireland at IATA, the International Air Transport Association.

“It was widely expected that some countries would be added [on June 3],” he says. “And they said they’d have an early warning.”

Announcing the update on June 3, the UK’s transport secretary Grant Shapps called it a “safety-first approach.”

Instead, McNamara insists, the government “did precisely the thing they said they wouldn’t, and created chaos.”

The last straw

A man wearing a face mask walks past people enjoying a day at Parede beach in Cascais in the outskirts of Lisbon on May 26, 2020

Portugal’s removal from the green list drew fury from the travel industry.

PATRICIA DE MELO MOREIRA/AFP via Getty Images

Not just chaos; anger, too. The travel industry — crippled worldwide by the Covid-19 pandemic — was already feeling febrile. But Portugal’s removal from the green list tipped many industry workers over the edge.

Hence that email from

According to Tawuniya, Saudi Central Bank (SAMA) has approved a travel insurance product with the participation of some Saudi insurers. As reported by Arab News, Tawuniya – Saudi Arabia’s co-operative insurance organisation – announced it had received final approval for an insurance product for Saudis travelling overseas that covers Covid-19 risks. A move that follows the Kingdom’s decision to allow its citizens to travel internationally out of the region from 17 May, as long as they have received two doses of the Covid-19 vaccine, or one shot in cases where they have been vaccinated 14 days before departure as detailed by the Tawakkalna app – a piece of digital software developed in co-operation with the country’s Ministry of Health that helps control the spread of Covid by tracking and reducing movement that could spur an outbreak.  

Citizens who have recovered from the Covid-19 pandemic within the last six months will be also allowed to travel abroad. Those under 18 will be required to provide an insurance policy approved by SAMA. 

FRA establishes the Egyptian Association for Travel Insurance 

Meanwhile, Egypt has implemented a similar initiative – the country’s Financial Regulatory Authority (FRA) has co-ordinated with the Ministry of Interior to ensure that Egyptian citizens can access immediate assistance whilst travelling abroad in cases of accidents, emergencies, or illness. 

Travel insurance coverage, with a limit of €30,000, is to be given to more than 20 million Egyptians whose upcoming trips do not exceed 90 consecutive days, reports Daily News Egypt. The policies will also include cover for repatriation of the insured’s mortal remains. 

The new cover is provided under the newly established Egyptian Association for Travel Insurance, which will act as an umbrella organisation for insurance providers in Egypt. Those that are licensed by the FRA immediately become a member of the organisation. Travellers will therefore be able to go to any of FRA’s licensed providers to obtain the appropriate coverage for their travel. 

FRA Chairperson Mohamed Omran, who issued the declaration to establish to Egyptian Association of Travel Insurance, noted that as many countries stipulate that their travellers must be insured as a condition of inbound travel, the association helps manage these travel insurance documents, as well as everything related to the travel insurance process, including collecting premiums for the documents, and claims submitted by insureds and treating healthcare facilities. 

Back in November 2020, ITIJ assessed the opportunities for travel insurance uptake and distribution in the Middle East & North Africa (MENA) region, and found that growing expat numbers meant that IPMI policy purchases were surging, and that the growing use of technology could drive an increased interest in travel insurance.