Donna Pearson is one of the estimated 2,000 nurses in Mississippi who left a full-time hospital job during the pandemic.

“We work hard and just weren’t seeing the benefits,” Pearson said.

Many — like Pearson — have just gone to another hospital, as a traveler.

“I’m going to follow the money,” she said. And the money, she said, is crazy.

The job market for nurses is way out of whack. Traveling registered nurses are making far more than full-time staffers doing the same job. And that’s causing staffers to hit the road to take a traveling gig, only to be replaced by an expensive traveler.

The escalating pay is a product of — and partially responsible for — staffing trouble in hospitals that has exceeded critical levels in recent weeks, especially in the undervaccinated South. 

Traveling nurses have always made more than full-time nurses at hospitals and usually get a stipend for meals and lodging. But now, it’s many times more. Pearson is headed to Midland, Texas, where she’ll make over $120 an hour. 

Recruiters are regularly luring nurses with contracts exceeding $5,000 a week.

Subsidized by federal relief funds

How can hospitals afford it? Several Southern states, including Texas and Mississippi, are using their federal COVID-19 relief money to help the facilities pay the ever-rising rates. The state Pearson is leaving is simultaneously bringing in 1,000 traveling nurses at a cost of $10 million a week.

Texas is up to nearly 4,000 travel nurses funded by the government, said Carrie Kroll with the Texas Hospital Association.

But for the hospitals, there are downsides to relying so heavily on high-paid travelers — mostly morale. 

“It does take its toll,” Kroll said.

In Texas, Kroll said, some hospitals are offering staff nurses retention bonuses. But it’s nothing like the money the same hospitals are paying these temporary nurses, who often need some help getting up to speed.

And it’s the lower-paid staff nurses who do the training.

“It is infuriating”

“When you have nurses working on a bedside and they’ve committed to staying, and their colleagues are leaving and are coming and making a lot more money than they are, I think it’s hard when you’re in this environment and you’ve been dealing with COVID day after day,” she said.

“Hard” is not the word Taylor Wylie uses. She’s an intensive care unit nurse in Nashville, Tennessee.

“I mean, it is just infuriating that they are willing to pay these travelers beaucoup dollars,” she said.

It seems like the only way to get a pandemic payday is to leave, Wylie said, even though the hospital will likely have to fill the vacancy with a pricey traveler.

“Just within the past couple of weeks, we’ve had so many nurses put in their two weeks and go travel,” she said. “I’ve seen contracts upwards of $10,000 to $12,000 a week because hospitals are so desperate for staff.”

Projected nurse shortage

The nursing workforce is projected to fall short of

HARTFORD, Conn. (WTNH) – It has been a long week, an emotional week for law enforcement throughout Connecticut and the region. He comes from a large family of State Troopers, and the turnout of support was overwhelming. 

Thousands of officers and troopers, from all around Connecticut, all around the country, traveled through the rain, through the dark clouds with polished gold badges wrapped in black to pay respects to one of their own. 

Troopers from California to New York, Texas to New Mexico, stood at attention for their colleague in the casket, and to stand behind the family of Sergeant Bryan Mole.

“First of all, you think about the family the family is now without a husband and a father a brother a son, and what that means moving forward, also what it means to the department,” said Butch Hyatt, Guilford Police Department.

Sergeant Mohl is the 25th trooper to be killed in the line of duty, and today they remember him for the man, and leader that he was. A field training officer to many brand-new young troopers fresh out of Academy, a mentor to others, and A good friend, someone you could rely on. And while Many people Officers didn’t know him, they knew what he stood for, and what he did for the people of Connecticut. 

“Your wife your kids know when you walk out that door, you might not come back,” said Chief Edward Stephens, Wolcott Police Department.

Dennis Lopes flew in from New Mexico to stand at attention in the rain for a fallen colleague.

“We will go any distance to show our support… Why? When you become a police officer you’ll understand that more, it’s about the respect and the earth we take and what we have to do on a daily basis,” said Dennis Lopes, New Mexico State Police.

When you look around at all of the different states and towns they’re here, many didn’t know him, but how well-known is a Sgt. Mohl? News 8 talked to a California trooper who came out here because he says this is my friend, I know him, and there are no words for the loss they’re feeling.

“Also, what it does to the department sometimes it helps brings the department together and a little closer, people understand that it could be anybody at any time,” Chief Stephens said.

Sgt. Mohl comes from a large law-enforcement family, with two brothers in the New York State Police one a major, another one a sergeant. There is a heavy presence of New York State Troopers standing side-by-side with Connecticut Troopers on the ground as well as in the air.

After the funeral Connecticut State Police Trooper, one in a New York State Police helicopter will fly over the funeral at the end.

Flags with the logo of Allianz SE, Europe’s biggest insurer, are pictured before the company’s annual shareholders’ meeting in Munich, Germany May 3, 2017. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Sept 7 (Reuters) – An Australian court fined local units of Allianz SE (ALVG.DE) for selling travel insurance to ineligible customers and not properly disclosing how it calculated premiums on Expedia (EXPE.O) websites, the country’s corporate watchdog said.

Two units of German insurer Allianz were on Monday fined a total of A$1.5 million ($1.12 million) in a civil case brought by the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) in September last year.

The units, Allianz Australia and AWP Australia, committed A$10 million in October last year to compensate around 31,500 customers who were sold potentially incorrect travel insurance through Allianz’s own website and Expedia, ASIC said.

Allianz Australia issued the travel insurance while AWP handled its sale.

“The insurance industry needs to be transparent and accurate when selling and promoting their products,” ASIC Deputy Chair Sarah Court said in a statement.

ASIC said the court took into consideration the early admission by the Allianz companies in deciding the penalty.

The German company said it self-reported the matter in 2018 and did not contest the penalty sought by the ASIC.

“Allianz and AWP welcome the finalisation of this matter,” Allianz said in an emailed statement.

The two units also face separate criminal charges for allegedly making inaccurate statements between 2016 and 2018 when selling both domestic and international travel insurance.

($1 = 1.3444 Australian dollars)

Reporting by Nikhil Kurian Nainan in Bengaluru; Editing by Sandra Maler

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Tacos are such a popular meal in the United States that they have their own day, a sacred weekly occurrence that even NBA star LeBron James  celebrates – “Taco Tuesday.” Now, McCormick is taking advantage of the dish’s popularity with a new job announcement: Director of Taco Relations.

The signature spice company announced it is conducting a nationwide search for “anyone ready to take their love for this versatile dish to the next level.” And yes, it is a real job.

The role is a part-time independent consulting job, one that pays $25,000 a month from September-December, totaling $100,000. Even better, it can be a remote position, meaning anyone can apply. The selected candidate will also receive products from the company, including all of its taco seasoning mixes.

Job duties will include working with the brand team to develop new recipes using McCormick seasoning and to travel across the country to visit famous taco chefs and the company’s headquarters in Hunt Valley, Maryland, to take part in a “taco immersion course.”

“McCormick’s Director of Taco Relations will ultimately honor and support the millions of Americans that rely on our taco seasoning every day while keeping McCormick at the forefront of the tacos of tomorrow,” McCormick chief marketing officer Jill Pratt said in a press release. 

Taco Tuesday with a twist: Virginia chef keeps selling out of ‘incredible’ Brood X cicada dish

Will there be snacks?: As workers return to the office, some perks like Taco Tuesdays may be in question

McCormick said the creation of this role stems from company research that found Americans eat roughly 4.5 billion tacos a year.

 “While taco trends continue to change and evolve, our seasoning has remained the first choice for countless families across the country,” Pratt said.

For those who wish to apply, McCormick is accepting applications up to July 20. Applications must include a video of the applicant showing off their personality and love of tacos in two minutes or less.

McCormick is one of the many companies that have offered unique job opportunities. California weed delivery service Emjay offered a paid internship for someone to test and review their products for three months, and streaming service MagellanTV offered to pay someone $2,400 to watch true crime shows for 24 hours straight.

Follow Jordan Mendoza on Twitter: @jord_mendoza.

Generally speaking, most people work simply because they need to, not because they dream of employment. We have to pay bills, eat, and have shelter, right? But if we must work to live, then it would be exceptionally cool to have a well-paying and wonderfully fun gig. Imagine getting lots of cash for doing something you love to do anyway…like eating tons of tacos. That’s exactly what one lucky human will get to do for McCormick. According to Delish, the famous spice company is looking for a Director of Taco Relations, and everything about this gig seems awesome.

The application website gives some very specific details for this position. First, there’s the obvious love that one must have for tacos. This person must have a borderline obsession with them. They will, after all, partner with the McCormick Kitchens team to develop cool, tasty new recipes. The taco expert will work remotely about 20 hours a week from September through December 2021, so it is not a forever gig. However, the pay is awesome. The Director of Taco Relations will earn a whopping $25,000 with a month with a total max income of $100,000. This is not a typo, nor some kind of weird joke.

And, to top it off, the Director of Taco Relations will get to travel across America to seek out taco trends, talk to other taco experts, and find a way to make every day Taco Tuesday. Of course, social media savvy and a winning personality are a must. There’s a high level of engagement that this person will have to do on a regular basis. For once, a job application with responsibilities and requirements that actually make sense!

a photo of several beef tacos in a line

a photo of several beef tacos in a line

Jeswin Thomas/Pexels

Applicants must be 21 or over and submit their application along with a video about why they deserve to be the Director of Taco Relations. McCormick will chose the lucky person and they will sign a contract and get to work. If this is your dream, then you better get creative and record your video quickly. The deadline for applications is July 20 at 11:59 PM EST. Good luck and may the biggest taco fan get their (temporary) dream job.

The post This Dream Job Will Pay You $100K to Travel and Eat Tacos appeared first on Nerdist.

Anthony Bourdain — rugged, unrefined and vulgar — was beloved worldwide. Watching his shows felt like touring the globe with a friend who was desperate to share a perfect meal with you. One night, you’re heading to Tehran for a home-cooked Persian feast. Next, you’re sitting on a plastic chair in a small noodle shop in Hanoi, Vietnam, sharing a cold beer and bowl of grilled pork with then-President Barack Obama. 

Bourdain seemed to relish these adventures and was apparently madly in love with his new girlfriend, actress Asia Argento, so it was a huge shock to fans and friends when he killed himself in 2018.

A new film explores Bourdain’s career — from line cook, to author, to TV celebrity — plus the weeks leading up to his death. It’s called “Roadrunner: A Film About Anthony Bourdain.” 

Its director, Academy Award winner Morgan Neville, tells KCRW that Bourdain’s TV producers discovered he was shy and had a tough time looking people in the eye when speaking with them. 

“[He] really had to figure out how to be himself on television. In no way was he a natural. What he was was smart and quick and funny. And he just had to figure out how to do that on camera, which he did, and did it incredibly well.” 

Neville says Bourdain’s hunger for knowledge allowed him to excel onscreen. “He read voraciously and retained everything he read. So he had this incredible storage of knowledge. And then once he had the chance to travel, it was like he’d been training for that job for decades. And suddenly he realized, ‘Oh, everything I know and everything I can do, I can channel it.’” 

He adds, “[Bourdain] understood that he was leaving behind the things that … kept him moored to a more sane life. And suddenly … traveling 250 days a year with something that was exciting on the one hand, but also totally frightening.”

Taking on fatherhood 

After divorcing his first wife, Bourdain remarried and had a daughter, Ariane. Neville says her birth added stability to his life.

“People who knew Tony as a chef could never, ever have imagined that this guy would have a child,” he says. “[He] really makes a real run at trying to be a domestic, as Tony would say, ‘50s TV dad’ in the backyard at the barbecue, cooking hot dogs and trying to entertain the neighbors.”

But he notes that Bourdain’s role as a father didn’t sway his hunger to travel. 

“There was always this ‘siren’s call of the road’. … His extreme restlessness of wanderlust, I think, was both one of his strengths and also one of his weaknesses.”

Exploitation or exposure?

According to Neville, Bourdain was initially shocked that anyone would pay him to travel, but as he became more prominent, he grew hyper aware of potentially exploiting the communities he visited.  

“Once he got to CNN and … his fame and the scope and depth of the show grew

Americans are going back to work at a faster clip — and getting paid more to do so.

Driving the news: The U.S. economy added a better-than-expected 850,000 jobs in June. Average hourly earnings jumped 3.6% from a year ago, in a continuation of the trend seen over the past two months.

Why it matters: These numbers back up anecdotal evidence from employers across the country. Demand for workers is strong, forcing employers to raise the amount they’re offering to be able to compete.

The leisure and hospitality sector added a stunning 343,000 jobs — more than a third of June’s total job gains.

  • That’s a big deal, because industry employers have been the most vocal about their inability to find workers.

America’s wages have hit a new record high of $30.40 per hour, up from $29.35 a year ago and $28.51 pre-pandemic.

What they’re saying: “It turns out that you can find workers, you just have to pay a better wage than in the past, because wages of low-wage workers are going up,” economist Betsey Stevenson tweeted.

Data: BLS; Chart: Axios Visuals

But, but, but: The pickup in pay isn’t helping pull workers off the sidelines yet.

  • The proportion of the population that’s in the labor force — 61.6% — didn’t budge. That number is well below its 63.3% pre-pandemic level.

The big picture: The still-elevated unemployment rate, along with the still-low total number of workers in the economy, indicates that the Fed has a long way yet to go before it reaches its full employment mandate.

  • The millions of potential workers still on the sidelines will also reassure economists that a tight labor market isn’t likely to cause runaway inflation.

The bottom line: The job market is still 6.7 million jobs short of where it was before the pandemic hit.

There may be many exemptions in coverage at the moment since the Canadian government is still advising against non-essential travel to all foreign countries, the Travel Health Insurance Association of Canada said

Canadians who are eager to be part of the first wave of travellers to head abroad once border restrictions ease should pay close attention to what their travel insurance will and will not cover, experts say.

There may be many exemptions in coverage at the moment since the Canadian government is still advising against non-essential travel to all foreign countries, the Travel Health Insurance Association of Canada said.

In particular, travellers should confirm that their policy covers trip cancellation and COVID-19-related health emergencies, said Will McAleer, Executive Director of THIA.

“The key thing to look for is will your policy cover you if there’s a travel advisory to avoid all non-essential travel,” he said.

According to McAleer, most insurance providers will not currently cover trip interruptions that happen before you leave and are a direct impact of the pandemic.

In addition, many providers will likely make changes to how much compensation you’re entitled to for common claims.

He said many insurance providers have lower maximum payout amounts for issues related to COVID-19, and may only pay a small per diem in certain scenarios, rather than a large overall amount.

For example, he said some insurance providers capped per diem payments at around $150 for people who get COVID-19 and incur expenses related to quarantine measures and testing.

One way to maximize what you’re entitled to is by getting vaccinated, McAleer said.

The travel association said some insurance companies are already mandating different maximum payouts for people based on their vaccination status. McAleer said one insurance agency he knows of has a maximum payout of $5 million for a COVID-19 related medical emergency for fully vaccinated clients, compared to only a $1 million payout for those who aren’t.

Even if you do your due diligence, consumers should expect to have to pay some money out of pocket if their trip is disrupted, said Ian Lee, an associate professor at Carleton University’s Sprott School of Business. 

“There’s lots of fine print restrictions,” said Lee. 

“Anyone who says, ‘I just want to be completely insured so if I go abroad I don’t lose a penny to get back home,’ I think that’s an expectation that’s not valid.”

He said travellers should be aware that insurance companies can change their policies on a whim, and said those companies need to protect themselves from taking on too much risk.

According to Lee, the top risk facing travellers is the threat of border closures that spark a mad rush to change flights and get back home.

Both McAleer and Lee say they expect travel insurance will start returning to normal when there is more certainty around the end of the pandemic, and when countries lift their travel advisories. 

McAleer said consumers should also carefully consider where they decide to spend their holiday, since the

Travellers arrive at Terminal 3 at Pearson Airport in Toronto on Feb. 22, 2021. Experts say Canadians looking to head abroad once border restrictions ease should pay close attention to what their travel insurance will and will not cover.

Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press

Canadians who are eager to be part of the first wave of travellers to head abroad once border restrictions ease should pay close attention to what their travel insurance will and will not cover, experts say.

There may be many exemptions in coverage at the moment since the Canadian government is still advising against non-essential travel to all foreign countries, the Travel Health Insurance Association of Canada said.

In particular, travellers should confirm that their policy covers trip cancellation and COVID-19-related health emergencies, said Will McAleer, executive director of THIA.

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Canada’s quarantine hotels, provinces’ border rules: What you need to know about travel

“The key thing to look for is will your policy cover you if there’s a travel advisory to avoid all non-essential travel,” he said.

According to McAleer, most insurance providers will not currently cover trip interruptions that happen before you leave and are a direct impact of the pandemic.

In addition, many providers will likely make changes to how much compensation you’re entitled to for common claims.

He said many insurance providers have lower maximum payout amounts for issues related to COVID-19, and may only pay a small per diem in certain scenarios, rather than a large overall amount.

For example, he said some insurance providers capped per diem payments at around $150 for people who get COVID-19 and incur expenses related to quarantine measures and testing.

One way to maximize what you’re entitled to is by getting vaccinated, McAleer said.

The travel association said some insurance companies are already mandating different maximum payouts for people based on their vaccination status. McAleer said one insurance agency he knows of has a maximum payout of $5 million for a COVID-19 related medical emergency for fully vaccinated clients, compared to only a $1 million payout for those who aren’t.

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Am I eligible for a first or second COVID-19 vaccine dose? The latest rules by province

Even if you do your due diligence, consumers should expect to have to pay some money out of pocket if their trip is disrupted, said Ian Lee, an associate professor at Carleton University’s Sprott School of Business.

“There’s lots of fine print restrictions,” said Lee.

“Anyone who says, ‘I just want to be completely insured so if I go abroad I don’t lose a penny to get back home,’ I think that’s an expectation that’s not valid.”

He said travellers should be aware that insurance companies can change their policies on a whim, and said those companies need to protect themselves from taking on too much risk.

According to Lee, the top risk facing travellers is the threat of border closures that spark a mad rush to change flights and get back home.

Canadians who are eager to be part of the first wave of travellers to head abroad once border restrictions ease should pay close attention to what their travel insurance will and will not cover, experts say.

Canadians who are eager to be part of the first wave of travellers to head abroad once border restrictions ease should pay close attention to what their travel insurance will and will not cover, experts say.

There may be many exemptions in coverage at the moment since the Canadian government is still advising against non-essential travel to all foreign countries, the Travel Health Insurance Association of Canada said.

In particular, travellers should confirm that their policy covers trip cancellation and COVID-19-related health emergencies, said Will McAleer, Executive Director of THIA.

“The key thing to look for is will your policy cover you if there’s a travel advisory to avoid all non-essential travel,” he said.

According to McAleer, most insurance providers will not currently cover trip interruptions that happen before you leave and are a direct impact of the pandemic.

In addition, many providers will likely make changes to how much compensation you’re entitled to for common claims.

He said many insurance providers have lower maximum payout amounts for issues related to COVID-19, and may only pay a small per diem in certain scenarios, rather than a large overall amount.

For example, he said some insurance providers capped per diem payments at around $150 for people who get COVID-19 and incur expenses related to quarantine measures and testing.

One way to maximize what you’re entitled to is by getting vaccinated, McAleer said.

The travel association said some insurance companies are already mandating different maximum payouts for people based on their vaccination status. McAleer said one insurance agency he knows of has a maximum payout of $5 million for a COVID-19 related medical emergency for fully vaccinated clients, compared to only a $1 million payout for those who aren’t.

Even if you do your due diligence, consumers should expect to have to pay some money out of pocket if their trip is disrupted, said Ian Lee, an associate professor at Carleton University’s Sprott School of Business. 

“There’s lots of fine print restrictions,” said Lee. 

“Anyone who says, ‘I just want to be completely insured so if I go abroad I don’t lose a penny to get back home,’ I think that’s an expectation that’s not valid.”

He said travellers should be aware that insurance companies can change their policies on a whim, and said those companies need to protect themselves from taking on too much risk.

According to Lee, the top risk facing travellers is the threat of border closures that spark a mad rush to change flights and get back home.

Both McAleer and Lee say they expect travel insurance will start returning to normal when there is more certainty around the end of the pandemic, and when countries lift their travel advisories. 

McAleer said consumers should also carefully consider where they decide to spend