America’s employers extended a streak of robust hiring in March, adding 431,000 jobs in a sign of the economy’s resilience in the face of a still-destructive pandemic, Russia’s war against Ukraine and the highest inflation in 40 years.

The government’s report Friday showed that last month’s job growth helped shrink the unemployment rate to 3.6%. That’s the lowest rate since the pandemic erupted two years ago and just above the half-century low of 3.5% that was reached two years ago.

Despite the inflation surge, persistent supply bottlenecks, damage from COVID-19 and now a war in Europe, employers have added at least 400,000 jobs for 11 straight months. In its report, the government also sharply revised up its estimate of hiring in January and February by a combined 95,000 jobs.

The job growth in March, though solid, was the lowest since September and slightly below what economists had expected. Still, Vincent Reinhart, chief economist at Dreyfus and Mellon, said the numbers show that “the U.S. economy continues to have underlying momentum and that firms are taking workers when they can.″

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The March report sketched a bright picture of the job market, with steady hiring and rising wages. Average hourly pay has risen a strong 5.6% over the past 12 months, welcome news for employees across the economy. For leisure and hospitality workers, including people who work in hotels, restaurants and bars, average pay has jumped 11.8% from a year earlier — “a clear sign that employers are desperate for staff,” said Saru Jayaraman, president of One Fair Wage, which advocates for better pay and conditions for service employees.

For most workers, though, pay raises aren’t keeping up with the spike in inflation that has put the Federal Reserve on track to raise rates multiple times, perhaps aggressively, in the coming months. Those rate hikes will result in costlier loans for many consumers and businesses. In the meantime, worker pay raises, a response in many cases to labor shortages, are themselves feeding the economy’s inflation pressures.

The steady job growth has failed to buoy President Joe Biden’s flagging popularity, with the gains overshadowed in the public’s mind by chronically high inflation. With Russia’s invasion of Ukraine driving oil and gasoline prices higher, Biden has announced plans to release a million barrels of oil daily from the U.S. strategic reserve for the next six months.

Since the pandemic struck in 2020, many Americans have remained on the sidelines of the job market, a trend that has contributed to the worker shortage in many industries. But in an encouraging sign for the economy, 418,000 people began looking for a job in March, and many found one. Over the past year, 3.8 million people have rejoined the labor force, meaning they now either have a job or are looking for one.

Across the economy, hiring gains were widespread last month. Restaurants and bars added 61,000 jobs, retailers 49,000, manufacturers 38,000 and hotels 25,000. Construction

Elite travel and youth sports athletes will descend on campus for the first of six sold-out Champions Weekends

ATLANTA – March 24, 2022 – (Newswire.com)

LakePoint Sports, the country’s premier travel and youth sports destination, is hosting the sold-out Academy Sports + Outdoors “March of Champions” weekend, Friday, March 25, through Sunday, March 27. 

Demand to compete at the LakePoint campus is at a fever pitch, as elite travel and youth sports athletes look to play in state-of-the-art venues, utilize the best in technology to improve their skills and get noticed by college coaches and pro scouts.

“Elite travel sports athletes understand that competing at LakePoint Sports during the Academy Sports + Outdoors ‘March of Champions’ weekend means they have an opportunity to be seen by college coaches and pro scouts,” David Pate, director of marketing at LakePoint Sports, said. “Coaches and scouts consistently tune in to LakePoint Live, powered by PlaySight, our state-of-the-art live streaming platform.”

Between RYZE Hoops, Prep Baseball Report Tournaments, NFL FLAG, and Rally Volleyball, this weekend will feature the best travel and youth sports athletes from across the nation. 

“We are excited Academy Sports + Outdoors is the title sponsor for this action-packed weekend,” said Greg Barckhoff, executive vice president of partnerships and marketing at LakePoint Sports. As one of the nation’s largest sporting goods and outdoor stores, Academy Sports + Outdoors is offering our travel athletes an exclusive mobile discount that provides them with the best equipment before the competition. In addition, this weekend will feature DJs, partner promotions, food & beverage specials, a live broadcast from the southeast’s No. 1 sports talk radio station 680 the Fan, and more.”

The RYZE Hoops Tip Off Classic highlights the “March of Champions” weekend. It begins on March 26 and will include nationally ranked four- and five-star players, such as Isaiah Collier (Wheeler High School Class of 2023) and Stephon Castle (Newton High School Class of 2023). Most players are still considering offers, and several Power 5 college programs will be tuning in to watch the action via LakePoint Live, powered by PlaySight. Division I coaches will not be in attendance due to NCAA recruiting rules. However, Division II and III coaches will be on campus to see the players show off their talent.

The LakePoint Baseball Village will host two events this weekend, the Prep Baseball Report (PBR) National High School Select and Prep Baseball Report Tournaments (PBRT) Georgia Major Elite. The National High School Select will feature several elite players on pro scouts’ and college coaches’ radars, including several Power 5 colleges. The Georgia Major Elite will provide 14-and-under travel teams the chance to see how they measure up against the state’s rising travel stars. 

New to the “March of Champions” weekend this year, NFL FLAG will kick off Georgia’s Friday Night Lights series, consisting of over 20 weekends through the year, at the LakePoint Multi-purpose Fields Complex. NFL FLAG, powered by Reigning Champs Experiences (RCX), is the leading flag football organization

The Legislature Building of the U.S. Virgin Islands on St. Thomas (Source file photo by Bethaney Lee)

34th Legislature of the Virgin Islands

Senate Calendar

Monday, March 21

9 a.m.

Earle B. Ottley Legislative Hall

Committee on Housing, Transportation and Telecommunications

Agenda:

Meeting Call to Order

Roll Call

Reading of the Agenda and Correspondence

BLOCK I – 9:10 a.m.

A discussion on the status of housing opportunities, home ownership opportunities and plans for the future of housing in the Virgin Islands

BREAK: 12:30 p.m. – 1 p.m.

BLOCK II

1 p.m.

A discussion on Housing Stability and plans to address Homelessness in the Virgin Islands.

Tuesday, March 22

10 a.m.

Earle B. Ottley Legislative Hall

Committee of the Whole

Agenda:

The 34th Legislature will hear testimony on the proposed settlement agreement with Southland Gaming of the Virgin Islands Inc. and VIGL Operations LLC to facilitate the construction of the Clinton E. Phipps Racetrack facility on St. Thomas, to support and improve horseracing in the Virgin Islands, and to facilitate the implementation of video lottery at the racetrack on St. Thomas.

Wednesday, March 23

9:30 a.m.

Earle B. Ottley Legislative Hall, St. Thomas

Committee on Rules and Judiciary

Agenda

BLOCK I

9:30 a.m.

VI Board of Optometrist Examiners:

Nomination of Dr. Carl Maschauer O.D.

BLOCK II:

Virgin Islands Casino Control Commission:

Nomination of Carolyn Hermon-Percell Esq.

VI Real Estate Commission:

Nomination of Sharon Amey

Nomination of Laurent Alfred Esq.

Nomination of Yvonne Toussaint

Nomination of Barbara J. Harris

BLOCK III

Bill No. 34-0101 — An Act amending the Virgin Islands Code, Title 3, chapters 1 and 15; Title 23, chapter 7; and Title 33, section 3032 to add a unit within the existing Virgin Islands Fire Service for emergency medical services and to establish the Virgin Islands Fire and Emergency Medical Services to provide fire prevention services, fire suppression services, emergency medical services and for the protection of life and property; to require the Fire Service and the Emergency Medical Services to develop and merger plans, and to provide for the transfer of employees from the Fire Service and the Emergency Medical Services to the Virgin Islands Fire and Emergency Medical Services; and to provide for other related purposes

Bill No. 34-0166 — An Act amending Title 22, Virgin Islands Code, chapter 27 by changing the name of the chapter to “The Virgin Islands Unauthorized and Surplus Lines Insurer Act” and by establishing the diligent search requirements that an authorized surplus lines broker must fulfill before placing coverage for certain lines of insurance with a surplus lines’ insurer in the territory; and for other purposes.

Bill No. 34-0191 — An Act amending Title 22, Virgin Islands Code, chapter 55 relating to captive insurance companies to clarify the purpose of the chapter, and to prohibit the organization within the Virgin Islands of a special category of multi-state insurers that may not be required to comply with the accreditation standards established by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners and adopted by the territory

Disney announced that the Disney Dreamers Academy will once again transform the lives of young people in March of 2022. Each year Disney invites high school students throughout the country to apply for one very sought after spot. In fact, only 100 lucky students will receive the all-expenses-paid trip to Walt Disney World to participate. 

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Over four days Disney Dreamers will train in various seminars throughout the parks to improve their communication, leadership and networking abilities. They will also experience valuable mentorship opportunities with Disney Cast Members, industry experts, and special celebrity guests.

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During its history the Disney Dreamers Academy has invited over 1300 students to explore a vast array of career specialties found throughout Walt Disney World. After the pandemic put a wrench in Disney programming in 2020, the Academy went virtual. But next year Disney Dreamers will return in person, just in time to celebrate the 15th anniversary of the program!

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Applications are open now. If you are interested in “dreaming big for your future” you can head on over to DisneyDreamersAcademy.com to apply for your spot!

As always, keep following WDWNT for all of your Disney Parks news, and for the absolute latest, follow WDW News Today on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

The Acadiana area lost another 300 jobs between March and April but has still added 8,600 jobs over the year, data shows. 

Louisiana added 6,800 jobs month-to-month, for a total of 1.8 million, according to data released Friday by the Louisiana Workforce Commission. That’s 123,000 more jobs, or 7.2% more than in April 2020. The numbers are not seasonally adjusted.

The data was compiled through surveys conducted in mid-April, a few weeks after the state allowed everyone over the age of 16 to get the COVID vaccine.

Education and health services was down 800 jobs over the month to 32,700. The sector was up 2,800 jobs for the year.

Leisure and hospitality was up 100 jobs over the month and 6,400 jobs over the year to 19,300 jobs. Mining and logging, which includes oil and gas, was up 100 jobs over the month but still down 3,400 jobs over the year, or 9.4% for 10,000 jobs.

The unemployment rate in Lafayette, not seasonally adjusted, was 5.9% in April, down from 6.4% in March and a peak in April 2020 of 11.3%.

Louisiana’s April unemployment rate was 6.6%, flat over the month and down from 12.7% over the year. The U.S. unemployment rate was 5.7% compared to 6.2% in March and down from 14.4% in April 2020.

CAPITAL REGION: The Baton Rouge metro area lost another 1,500 jobs between March and April but has rebounded from the height of job losses during the coronavirus pandemic. The Capital Region had 387,100 jobs in April, up 32,700 jobs, 9.2% more than compared to April 2020. The leisure and hospitality sector lost 700 jobs between March and April, adding back 13,400 jobs, or 60% over the year to 35,700. Trade, transportation and utilities were down 1,000 jobs over the month and up 5,000 jobs over the year, up 7.9%, for 67,800 jobs.

Construction dropped month-over-month, losing another 100 jobs but recovering 5,000 since last year, or 13.6%, for 41,600 jobs overall. Education and health services lost 100 jobs, but was up 3,500 jobs, or 7.2% over the year. Professional and business services added 300 jobs since March and 600 jobs compared to last year, or 1.3%, to 46,500.

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The Baton Rouge unemployment rate, not seasonally adjusted, was 5.8%, flat compared to March, but down from highs of 11.7% in April 2020.

NEW ORLEANS: The New Orleans metro area added 4,500 jobs in April from the month before, but the area still has nearly 60,000 fewer jobs than it did before the start of the COVID pandemic.

There were 526,400 nonfarm jobs in the region in April, compared to 521,900 jobs in March. In comparison, there were 586,300 jobs in February 2020.

The Crescent City added 42,100 jobs from April 2020, an 8.7% gain.

The leisure and hospitality sector added 2,000 jobs month-to-month for 64,300 jobs. That was up 20,800 jobs, or 47.8%, from April 2020.

Education and health services added 1,000 jobs from

The Baton Rouge metro area lost another 1,500 jobs between March and April but has rebounded from the height of job losses during the coronavirus pandemic. 

The Capital Region had 387,100 jobs in April, up 32,700 jobs, 9.2% more than compared to April 2020. 

Louisiana added 6,800 jobs month-to-month, for a total of 1.8 million, according to data released Friday by the Louisiana Workforce Commission. That’s 123,000 more jobs, or 7.2% more than in April 2020. The numbers are not seasonally adjusted.

The data was compiled through surveys conducted in mid-April, a few weeks after the state allowed everyone over the age of 16 to get the COVID vaccine. 

The Baton Rouge leisure and hospitality sector lost 700 jobs between March and April, adding back 13,400 jobs, or 60% over the year to 35,700. 

Trade, transportation and utilities were down 1,000 jobs over the month and up 5,000 jobs over the year, up 7.9%, for 67,800 jobs. 

Construction dropped month-over-month, losing another 100 jobs but recovering 5,000 since last year, or 13.6%, for 41,600 jobs overall. 

Education and health services lost 100 jobs, but was up 3,500 jobs, or 7.2% over the year.

Professional and business services added 300 jobs since March and 600 jobs compared to last year, or 1.3%, to 46,500. 

Information, which includes the motion picture industry, was up 100 jobs over the month and 500 jobs over the year to 4,600 jobs. 

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The Baton Rouge unemployment rate, not seasonally adjusted, was 5.8%, flat compared to March, but down from highs of 11.7% in April 2020.  

Louisiana’s April unemployment rate was 6.6%, flat over the month and down from 12.7% over the year. The U.S. unemployment rate was 5.7% compared to 6.2% in March and down from 14.4% in April 2020. 

NEW ORLEANS: The New Orleans metro area added 4,500 jobs in April from the month before, but the area still has nearly 60,000 fewer jobs than it did before the start of the COVID pandemic.

There were 526,400 nonfarm jobs in the region in April, compared to 521,900 jobs in March. In comparison, there were 586,300 jobs in February 2020. 

The Crescent City added 42,100 jobs from April 2020, an 8.7% gain.

The leisure and hospitality sector added 2,000 jobs month-to-month for 64,300 jobs. That was up 20,800 jobs, or 47.8%, from April 2020.

Education and health services added 1,000 jobs from March to hit 102,800. That was up 7,100 jobs from April 2020. Trade, transportation and utilities added 700 jobs to hit 104,600, up 8,300 from April 2020.

The New Orleans unemployment rate was 8.1%, up from 7.5% in March but down from 16.6% in April 2020.

LAFAYETTE AREA: Acadiana lost 300 jobs between March and April to reach 190,000 jobs. It added back 8,600 jobs over the year. Education and health services was down 800 jobs over the month to 32,700. The sector was up 2,800 jobs for the year. Leisure and

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Borrowers can use the short-term scholar mortgage repayment charges to energy their monetary health. Here are 4 ways to make use of these funds to extend your financial savings or pay down debt. You might be surprised to know that this is one of the best time to refinance as long as you look for this one lender feature.

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Small Business Week Town Hall: 3 Ways to Thrive in the New Normal – Inc.

Small Business Week Town Hall: 3 Ways to Thrive in the New Normal.

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Oregon’s 6% March unemployment rate matches the national unemployment rate


Oregon’s unemployment rate edged down to 6.0% in March, from 6.1% in February.

According to the Oregon Employment Department, for the past three months, Oregon’s unemployment rate has ticked down by a tenth of a point each month. During the past 11 months, the pace of recovery in Oregon’s unemployment rate has mirrored the national experience. The U.S. unemployment rate dropped to 6.0% in March, from 6.2% in February.

Nonfarm payroll employment rose 20,100 jobs in March, following a gain of 15,300, as revised, in February. Two-thirds of all the jobs gained in March were in leisure and hospitality (+13,900 jobs). Three other major industries each added more than 1,000 jobs: manufacturing (+2,000 jobs); professional and business services (+1,300); and transportation, warehousing, and utilities (+1,100). Construction and private educational services each added 700 jobs. All other major industries performed close to their normal seasonal patterns.

The 20,100 total nonfarm jobs added in March was Oregon’s largest monthly gain since 38,300 jobs were added in July. March’s gain was the third monthly increase, following a large drop in December that was the result of temporary, heightened restrictions at the time.

In March, Oregon’s nonfarm payroll, employment totaled 1,840,600, a drop of 132,400 jobs, or 6.7% from the pre-recession peak in February 2020. Oregon’s employment dropped to a low of 1,687,500 by April 2020. Since then, Oregon has recovered 153,100 jobs, or 54% of the jobs lost between February and April 2020.

Over the past year, the employment gyrations in leisure and hospitality have accounted for a large share of the swings in Oregon’s total employment. This broad industry includes restaurants, bars, coffee shops, hotels, golf courses and fitness centers. It employed a peak of 216,300 jobs in February 2020, which was 11% of total nonfarm payroll employment. Then, within two months, leisure and hospitality cut over half its jobs.

Since then, the industry recovered about half the drop, to employ 165,200 jobs by November. Then, hit by renewed COVID restrictions, the industry retrenched to 136,800 jobs in December. Since then, the industry added 25,900 jobs over the past three months and is close to its recent high point from last November, but is still far below its February 2020 peak.


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Nevada adds jobs back in March; Unemployment rate continues to improve

CARSON CITY – According to the Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation’s (DETR) March 2021 economic report, employment in Nevada added back 4,700 jobs over the month as the state continues to recover. Jobs remain below typical levels, and are down 134,800 jobs since March 2020, for an annual decline of 9.4 percent. The total employment level in the state is 1,296,200. The state’s unemployment rate in March is 8.1 percent, down from 8.4 percent in February but up 1.7 percentage points when compared to March 2020.

Lincoln County’s unemployment rate is 3.2 percent an improvement over February’s mark of 4.2 percent.
Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) Employment (Seasonally Adjusted):
· Las Vegas employment increased by 4,400 jobs (0.5%) since February, a decrease of 126,200 jobs (-12.1%) since March 2020.
· Reno employment had an increase of 700 jobs (0.3%) since February, a decrease of 4,800 jobs (-1.9%) since March 2020.
· Carson City employment was unchanged since February, a decrease of 300 jobs (-1.0%) since March 2020.

“For the state as a whole, employment increased over the month with leisure and hospitality contributing the largest increase in employment, with the gains concentrated in the Las Vegas area, said David Schmidt, Chief Economist for DETR. “Although job growth from February to March is typical in leisure and hospitality, this month’s job growth and news about increased activity following relaxation of capacity restrictions on businesses is encouraging.

Nevada’s unemployment rate declined slightly from February’s revised level but remains above eight percent. While there is still ongoing significant disruption highly concentrated in the Las Vegas area, the state is adding jobs back in businesses that cater to tourism which indicates firms in the state may be gearing up to capture the pent up demand for travel and tourism worldwide.

“The combination of increasing activity, relaxed restrictions, increasing vaccine availability, and the return of work search requirements on unemployment claims should be reflected in increased employment and economic activity as we head into the summer, though current employment levels still remain well below pre-pandemic levels,” Schmidt said.

DETR’s report also notes that additional labor market data can be found on the department’s employment and unemployment dashboards located at www.nevadaworkforce.com.

Following months of steady increases, the average home sales price dipped less than 1% in March, to $244,483. The quarterly average of $245,184 was nearly 8% higher than the three-month norm last year.

Employment numbers and job availability stimulated discussion among those attending the Zoom meeting Thursday on Ingham’s findings.

The number of people holding jobs in March totaled 123,900, an estimated 700 more than were working in March last year, when the pandemic began to pick up steam. Collins, who presented Ingham’s findings via Zoom, said 2020 was shaping up to become a record-shattering year economically.

The jobless rate, said Ingham, continues to fall slowly and stood at 6.1% in March compared to 4.7% in March last year. He said “unemployment rate movements typically lag behind the payroll employment numbers, and we should see improvements in both as the year progresses.”

Sam Castillo III, whose family owns La Fiesta restaurant and operates a bar and pizza parlor at the Union Hall food hall downtown, said finding and keeping employees remains among his top challenges.

“We are seeing a shortage of manpower,” he said. “We have people who don’t show up for interviews, or leave during the middle of a shift, knowing they can find a computer somewhere and apply for unemployment with a click.”