DEAR ABBY: I am currently without a job. I hesitated to inform my mother because I was sure her reaction would only add to my stress. I was right. She constantly corners me about my efforts to find a job. I talk to her nearly every day to keep up with how she and my stepfather are doing. Because she never fails to dig into me about my job search progress, I now find ways to shorten our conversations.

I can get a job or two to sustain my living expenses for the time being.

However, I’m trying to hold out for a job or career that connects to my soul passion. Working for decades in a job that sustains me and my children is no match for the longing of my passion. (I’m still not sure what it is.)

How do I curb my mother’s pushing me for a resolution without coming off as annoyed, which I am?

I’m sure she wants to express her concern, but I want support in my efforts without feeling condemned. Help me, please. — ANNOYED IN ALABAMA

DEAR ANNOYED: I will try. Because you still aren’t sure what your “soul passion” is, it’s time to find out. A place to start might be a career counseling center (some universities have them). Contact one or more and inquire whether they offer career counseling and aptitude testing. The test results will tell you what you are best suited for.

Of course, this service is not offered for free, which is why you might want to buckle down and take a job or two in the meantime to afford it, as well as to feed your little family.

As to your mother, who may be worried because you don’t yet have a plan of action, explain to her about seeking career counseling and she may calm down.

DEAR ABBY: I’ve been seeing a man, “Carson,” on and off for about five years. Last year, when I asked him if we were exclusive, he quickly said no, so I went and slept with an ex and became pregnant. I didn’t reach out to Carson because I thought the baby belonged to my ex, but when the baby was born I quickly realized she might be Carson’s. When I told him, he immediately denied she was his but still rekindled our relationship. Abby, he disappears frequently and doesn’t answer my calls. What should I do? Leave him? Stay? I do love him. — HOPELESS ROMANTIC IN PENNSYLVANIA

DEAR HOPELESS ROMANTIC: Have your child DNA-tested. If it proves she is Carson’s, he should be contributing to his daughter’s support. (The same goes for anyone else you think could be the father.) It’s important that you understand this man behaves the way he does because he is not in love with you and doesn’t care about your feelings.

He sees other women, just as he did the first time around. If this is the way you want to be treated,

CANANDAIGUA — The Lake House on Canandaigua received top marks from Travel + Leisure magazine’s 10 Best Resort Hotels in New York State Wednesday. According to a release from the hotel, the resort placed first in the 10 best hotels in New York, and received additional high marks in the magazine’s other notable lists.

The resort also placed second in the Top 15 Resort Hotels in the Continental U.S. and 30th in the magazine’s Top 100 Hotels in the World.

Each ranking came from the magazine’s World’s Best Awards for 2021, with the winners being determined by reader’s opinions on hotels and resorts. Voters rated hotels on their facilities, location, service, food and overall value.

This isn’t the first time the resort has been honored by Travel + Leisure. The hotel was also featured in the magazine’s 2021 “It List” from earlier this year, an honor General Manager Simon Dewar referred to as being similar to the motion picture industry’s Academy Awards. 

“It’s been an incredibly difficult year across the hospitality industry,” Dewar said, referring to the hotel’s placement on the It List, adding that it was “time for some good news.”

“It’s been a challenging time for all of us, not only from the pandemic itself but from the restrictions on travel during this pandemic,” he said, adding that the Lake House appearing on the list meant “we’re just over the moon. It’s incredible.” 

The Lake House, on the former site of the Inn on the Lake, was developed by the Sands family and includes a 125-guest hotel, timber-frame barn, dock and other amenities. The hotel also contains the Rose Tavern, a restaurant which offers a unique seasonal menu along with specialty drinks.

CANANDAIGUA, NY — The Lake House on Canandaigua received top marks from Travel + Leisure magazine’s 10 Best Resort Hotels in New York State Wednesday.

According to a release from the hotel, the resort placed first in the 10 best hotels in New York, and received additional high marks in the magazine’s other notable lists.

The resort also placed second in the Top 15 Resort Hotels in the Continental U.S. and 30th in the magazine’s Top 100 Hotels in the World.

Each ranking came from the magazine’s World’s Best Awards for 2021, with the winners being determined by reader’s opinions on hotels and resorts. Voters rated hotels on their facilities, location, service, food and overall value.

This isn’t the first time the resort has been honored by Travel + Leisure.

The Lake House on Canandaigua, as pictured in this rendering, receives the Canandaigua Chamber of Commerce's Environmental Champion of the Year Award.

The hotel was also featured in the magazine’s 2021 “It List” from earlier this year, an honor General Manager Simon Dewar referred to as being similar to the motion picture industry’s Academy Awards. 

“It’s been an incredibly difficult year across the hospitality industry,” Dewar said, referring to the hotel’s placement on the It List, adding that it was “time for some good news.”

“It’s been a challenging time for all of us, not only from the pandemic itself but from the restrictions on travel during this pandemic,” he said, adding that the Lake House appearing on the list meant “we’re just over the moon. It’s incredible.” 

File photo: The Lake House on Canandaigua co-developer shows a view from a hotel room during a tour.

The Lake House, on the former site of the Inn on the Lake, was developed by the Sands family and includes a 125-guest hotel, timber-frame barn, dock and other amenities.

The hotel also contains the Rose Tavern, a restaurant which offers a unique seasonal menu along with specialty drinks.

The most recent jobs report was disappointing. Only 235,000 jobs were created in August 2021, versus an expectation of 720,000. Leisure and hospitality jobs had led the way this year — until August. For the six months before August 2021, those industries had averaged 350,000 new jobs per month. Last month there were no job gains in the sectors. The drop-off in leisure and hospitality resulted in August’s jobs gains being the weakest monthly gain since January 2021.

The weakness was attributed to rising COVID-19 cases. Consumer demand ticked down as the uncertainty regarding new infections went up. U.S. infection cases are up to about 150,000 cases a day. The jobs report saw an increase of about 400,000 people who said they couldn’t work for pandemic-related reasons, bringing the total to 5.6 million. The reluctance of would-be workers confirmed the apprehension of businesses to bring on new employees. Corporations paused hiring as hot, hot, hot economic growth cooled to merely hot.

The Delta variant wave is a caterwauling reminder that the pandemic remains one of the most critical factors driving the economy, if not the single most crucial factor. One other significant factor is that, beginning as early as June 2021, roughly half of U.S. states opted out of taking the federal $300 weekly plus-up for unemployment benefits. Governors of those states argued that businesses were competing against the federal benefits for workers. Those additional federal plus-up benefits were eliminated for every state on Labor Day, September 6, 2021.

The governors hypothesized that by eliminating the additional benefit, people would go back to work. It’s too early to determine if that hypothesis is true or not. However, it is possible that the unintended consequence of denying those people that extra $300 per week resulted in the drop in aggregate demand. It’ll be interesting to look at all the data once enough time has passed in order to measure the fallout correctly. Not that there needs to be computational time; there needs to be enough time to compare periods. However, thus far, economists at JP Morgan and Columbia University have found “zero correlation” between job growth and states’ decisions to opt-out of federal unemployment aid.

We don’t yet honestly know the effect of eliminating those additional $300 weekly payments. If dropping the extra unemployment benefits does fail to pull people back into the workforce, it could create a negative feedback loop. Demand for goods and services will drop, and businesses won’t need to hire as many people. This risk is heightened because, as of September 6, 2021, benefits for self-employed and gig workers (freelancers) were terminated. Also on Labor Day, special consideration was canceled for those unemployed for more than six months. Roughly 8.9 million Americans will lose all or some of these benefits. For comparison, during the Financial Crisis of 2008, jobless benefits of different forms that began in 2008–2009 were extended until 2013. When those benefits ceased, there were 1.3 million people still receiving amped-up aid.

There was some

Thu, Sep 9th 2021 09:35 am

42% likely to cancel existing trips without rescheduling 

By the American Hotel & Lodging Association

U.S. leisure travelers plan to significantly pare back travel plans amid rising COVID-19 cases, with 69% planning to take fewer trips, 55% planning to postpone existing travel plans, and 42% likely to cancel existing plans without rescheduling, according to a new national survey conducted by Morning Consult on behalf of the American Hotel & Lodging Association (AHLA). Nearly three in four (72%) are likely to only travel to places within driving distance.

While leisure travel historically begins to decline after Labor Day, it remains critical throughout the year. The new survey highlights the ongoing negative effects of the pandemic on travel and underscores the need for targeted federal relief, such as the Save Hotel Jobs Act

More than one in five hotel jobs lost during the pandemic – nearly 500,000 in total – will not have returned by the end of this year. For every 10 people directly employed on a hotel property, hotels support an additional 26 jobs in the community, from restaurants and retail to hotel supply companies – meaning an additional nearly 1.3 million hotel-supported jobs are also at risk.

The survey of 2,200 adults was conducted Aug. 11-12, 2021. Of these, 1,707 people, or 78% of respondents, are leisure travelers – that is, those who indicated they may travel for leisure in 2021. Key findings among leisure travelers include the following:

√ 69% are likely to take fewer trips and 65% are likely to take shorter trips

√ 42% are likely to cancel existing travel plans with no plans to reschedule

√ 55% are likely to postpone existing travel plans until a later date

√ 72% are likely to only travel to places they can drive to

√ 70% are likely to travel with smaller groups 

“With COVID-19 cases rising and travel concerns mounting as we enter the fall and winter months, the hotel industry is at a pivotal point. Unless Congress acts, pandemic-related travel reductions will continue to threaten the livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of hotel workers,” said Chip Rogers, president and CEO of AHLA. “For over a year, hotel employees and small business owners across the nation have been asking Congress for direct pandemic relief. This data underscores why it’s time for Congress to act.”

Recently released AHLA survey results show that business travelers are also scaling back their travel plans amid rising COVID-19 cases. That includes 67% planning to take fewer trips, 52% likely to cancel existing travel plans without rescheduling, and 60% planning to postpone existing travel plans.

Hotels are the only segment of the hospitality and leisure industry yet to receive direct aid despite being among the hardest hit. That is why AHLA and UNITE HERE, the largest hospitality workers’ union in North America, joined forces to call on Congress to pass the bipartisan Save Hotel Jobs Act introduced by Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) and Rep. Charlie

U.S. leisure travelers plan to significantly pare back travel plans amid rising COVID-19 cases, with 69% planning to take fewer trips, 55% planning to postpone existing travel plans, and 42% likely to cancel existing plans without rescheduling, according to a new national survey conducted by Morning Consult on behalf of the American Hotel & Lodging Association (AHLA). Nearly three in four (72%) are likely to only travel to places within driving distance. 

While leisure travel historically begins to decline after Labor Day, it remains critical throughout the year. The new survey highlights the ongoing negative effects of the pandemic on travel and underscores the need for targeted federal relief, such as the Save Hotel Jobs Act

More than one in five hotel jobs lost during the pandemic—nearly 500,000 in total—will not have returned by the end of this year. For every 10 people directly employed on a hotel property, hotels support an additional 26 jobs in the community, from restaurants and retail to hotel supply companies—meaning an additional nearly 1.3 million hotel-supported jobs are also at risk. 

Scroll down for more…



 
The survey of 2,200 adults was conducted August 11-12, 2021. Of these, 1,707 people, or 78% of respondents, are leisure travelers—that is, those who indicated they may travel for leisure in 2021. Key findings among leisure travelers include the following:

69% are likely to take fewer trips and 65% are likely to take shorter trips
42% are likely to cancel existing travel plans with no plans to reschedule
55% are likely to postpone existing travel plans until a later date
72% are likely to only travel to places they can drive to
70% are likely to travel with smaller groups 

“With COVID-19 cases rising and travel concerns mounting as we enter the fall and winter months, the hotel industry is at a pivotal point. Unless Congress acts, pandemic-related travel reductions will continue to threaten the livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of hotel workers,” said Chip Rogers, president and CEO of AHLA. “For over a year, hotel employees and small business owners across the nation have been asking Congress for direct pandemic relief. This data underscores why it’s time for Congress to act.”

Scroll down for more…



 
Recently released AHLA survey results show that business travelers are also scaling back their travel plans amid rising COVID-19 cases. That includes 67% planning to take fewer trips, 52% likely to cancel existing travel plans without rescheduling, and 60% planning to postpone existing travel plans.

Hotels are the only segment of the hospitality and leisure industry yet to receive direct aid despite being among the hardest hit. That is why AHLA and UNITE HERE, the largest hospitality workers’ union in North America, joined forces to call on Congress to pass the bipartisan Save Hotel Jobs Act introduced by Senator Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) and Rep. Charlie Crist (D-Fla.). This legislation would provide a lifeline to hotel workers, providing the assistance they need to survive until travel returns to pre-pandemic levels.

In just one year, Ohio lost nearly 25% of its servers at restaurants across the state and recent data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Cleveland nonprofit Ohio Policy Matters show the leisure and hospitality industries aren’t on track to get many of those workers back.

At Stricker’s Grove, a 97-year-old family-run amusement park in Ross, Ohio, staffing on any given day can be a roller coaster.

“This is probably, as far as labor goes, the worst we’ve experienced it,” said Pamela Stricker, the park’s co-owner.

She and other family have been working in various spaces in the park themselves as Stricker’s Grove struggles to keep the full park staffed. There are typically enough workers to run rides for every private event, but staffing the games and golf areas when the park opens to the public four times a year sometimes involves a scramble.

“Sometimes I work at the front gate, sometimes I work at miniature golf,” said Stricker.

The park hopes to build bonds with workers through offers like free drinks all day and creating a welcoming family-like environment. It’s worked for loyal employee Kathy King, a retired Hamilton math teacher who works part time at the park. She and other die-hard employees are the few who returned after the park was shut down in 2020.

“It’s just … my happy place,” said King. “It’s nice to see both kids and adults have a good time and laugh and smile.”

The steady rise in unfilled job openings are charted in statistics from the U.S. Bureau of Labor. Mirroring that data, Ohio Policy Matters released a Labor Day report showing the leisure and hospitality industry made up 28% of all the state’s jobs destroyed during the pandemic.

The Strickers haven’t given up hope, however, and they believe what lies ahead will be better. Most of the park’s private-event clients plan to re-book for events next year and owners hope by then staffing will be closer to normal.

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A BIT OF HISTORY

Labor Day, a day to celebrate American workers by giving them a day off, was first celebrated as national holiday in 1894.

President Grover Cleveland signed the law designating the first Monday in September as Labor Day, but Colorado was one of the holiday’s early adopters. It was the second of five states that passed laws in 1887 to establish the holiday, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

The first Labor Day celebration actually took place on Sept. 5, 1882, in New York City and was organized by the Central Labor Union. There was a parade that nearly flopped because no band had been organized for the marchers. Fortunately, the Jewelers Union of Newark Two showed up with a band and saved the day.

BEST JOBS

These are the top 10 best jobs of 2021 as reported by U.S. News and World Report.

Jobs were ranked based on their various attributes or qualities, including work-life balance, pay and stress.

Medical and health services manager

Speech-language pathologist

JOBS ON THE RISE

These are LinkedIn’s top 15 in-demand jobs for 2021. Jobs were ranked based on demand and jobs available.

Frontline Ecommerce worker

Loan and mortgage experts

Health care supporting staff

Business development and sales professionals

Experts in workplace diversity

Digital marketing professionals

Professional and personal coaches

Mental health specialists

User experience professionals

Artificial intelligence practitioners

GENDER CENTS

American women’s annual overall earnings were 82% of what men made in 2019, according to a U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics report released in December. This statistic is for women working full-time and salary workers.

Broken down by race and ethnicity

Asian women earned 77% as much as Asian men (Overall, Asian women and men earned more than women and men of any other race and ethnicity).

White women earned 81% as much as white men.

Black women earned 92% as much as Black men.

Hispanic women earned 86% as much as Hispanic men. (Overall, Hispanic women and men earned less than women and men of any other race and ethnicity.)

Among women workers age 25 and older, the median weekly earnings in 2019 for those without a high school diploma was $592, for those with a diploma it was $746 and for those with a bachelor’s degree or higher it was $1,367.

ON THE MONEY

The average hourly wage for workers in Grand Junction was $23.61 in May of 2020, according to a July 14 report released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The nationwide average hourly wage is $27.07.

Employment in Grand Junction was highly concentrated in eight of 22 occupational groups.

Those groups, along with the number of workers in that field, are shown below:

Office and Administrative Support Occupations (clerks of all kinds, tellers, administrative assistants), 8,040.

Sales and Related Occupations (retail salespersons, cashiers), 6,500.

Food Preparation and Serving Related Occupations (cooks, bartenders, wait staff), 5,780.

Health care Practitioners and Technical Occupations (nurses, physicians, pharmacists), 5,060.

Construction and Extraction

A report from a UW-Madison think tank shows employment in the state’s leisure and hospitality industry remains 18.7 percent lower than before the pandemic.

The annual State of Working Wisconsin report from COWS details the change in job numbers across various industries between February 2020 and June 2021. COWS stands for Center on Wisconsin Strategy.

Wisconsin’s economy overall has 114,000 fewer jobs than in February 2020, the report shows. The greatest job losses were seen in leisure and hospitality, which includes hotels, bars and restaurants. The industry had 49,600 fewer jobs in July than before the pandemic hit.

The report notes that this sector had lost more than half of its workforce by April 2020 at the height of the pandemic. While it has been recovering as these businesses reopened, the report points to “volatility in the sector” limiting that rebound.

“It’s adding jobs unevenly, but more-or-less on a pretty consistent upswing,” said Laura Dresser, associate director of COWS. “I think people can see this in their communities … Many restaurants are working shorter hours, or doing only takeout or outside seating, so that kind of restructured some of that work.”

Meanwhile, other sectors have lost very few jobs over the course of the pandemic. State employment in manufacturing, information, professional and business services, and trade, transportation and utilities all dropped by 1 percent or less between February 2020 and June of this year.

Some differences were seen between Wisconsin’s pandemic job losses and U.S. industry job losses on a percentage basis. While the country lost 6.1 percent of its information jobs, Wisconsin lost just 0.6 percent. In contrast, the state lost 3.1 percent of its financial activities jobs over the same period while U.S. employment in the sector dropped 0.8 percent.

Wisconsin’s unemployment rate was 3.9 percent in July, which is below the national rate of 5.4 percent but still 0.4 percent above the rate from February 2020.

The COWS report also highlights the decline in private and public sector union membership seen in Wisconsin.

The report shows that 8.8 percent of the state’s workforce were union members in 2020.
In line with the national trend, the percentage of Wisconsin workers in unions has declined steadily since the mid-1960s, though it remained above the national level before dropping below in 2014.

The report shows 22.1 percent of the state’s public sector workers and 6.5 percent of private sector employees were union members in 2020.

Report authors say the “deeper decline” in union membership in the state over the past decade was directly caused by two pieces of state policy: Act 10, which restructured public sector unionization in Wisconsin after passing in 2011; and “right-to-work” legislation enacted in 2015 that impacted private sector unions.

“It probably does not surprise that Act 10 had a real impact on public sector unions,” Dresser said. “It wasn’t instant, but it’s a pretty dramatic slide in public sector unionization rates that go from over 40 percent down to 20 percent across a five-year period.”

The unemployment rate for the Valdez-Cordova census area was 5% in July, down from 6% in June and 7.8% in July a year ago, state labor officials said in their latest monthly report.

Statewide, July’s job numbers were up by 17,700 positions or 5.8% from a year ago, but still 30,100 jobs below July 2019 levels.

The Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development said that industries hit hardest last year, as the pandemic spread, had the most new jobs, but few have reached pre-pandemic job levels. Leisure and hospitality were up 5,100 jobs over last July, but still remained 10,800 below July 2019 levels. Trade, transportation and utilities added 5,200 jobs over a year ago, but were 6,000 below 2019 levels.

The only major industry with fewer jobs this July than last year was oil and gas, which lost over 4,000 jobs in 2020, falling to as low as 6,100 late last year, the lowest job numbers in decades.

The big question this year for the state has been when those jobs would begin coming back. The July estimate of 6,800 jobs, along with small upward revisions to previous months’ numbers, suggests modest signs of recovery there, state labor officials said.

The number of local government jobs rose by 600, while remaining 2,900 below July 2019. State government jobs were up by 100 from a year ago and 1,100 down from 2019. Federal employment was higher than both years, by 400 and 700 respectively.

Alaska’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate held at 6.6 percent in July, while the comparable national rate fell from 5.9% to 5.4%.