Moon Warn: Stay clear of shopping or significant decisions from 11 p.m. to 11:55 p.m. EDT now (8 p.m. to 8:55 p.m. PDT). After that, the Moon moves from Pisces into Aries.

Delighted Birthday for Monday, June 20, 2022:

You are light, imaginative and charismatic. Persons like you. Yet, you can be outspoken! You have an adventurous soul. Stay on your toes this calendar year, due to the fact it’s a time of modify. Fulfill new close friends who could help you. Be open up to new strategies and new instructions.

ARIES

(March 21-April 19)
★★★★★
This is a attractive way to start off your 7 days! Communications with day-to-working day contacts, siblings and relatives are optimistic and upbeat. This is a superb working day for people of you in revenue, marketing, educating, creating or acting, because individuals will pay attention to you. Tonight: You gain!

TAURUS

(April 20-May well 20)
★★★★
This is a strong money day! Search for ways to strengthen your profits. Spend notice to your moneymaking suggestions, in specific, concepts that you may well have viewed as previously but discarded. Another person from your previous or somebody who is behind the scenes can help you. Tonight: Solitude.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20)
★★★★★
It is a wonderful working day to start your week! Your ruler Mercury is dancing with blessed Jupiter, which is why you are pleasant, beneficial and optimistic these days. This mind-set will entice folks to you. People today want to be in your existence. Take pleasure in schmoozing with everybody. Tonight: Socialize.

Cancer

(June 21-July 22)
★★★★
This is a reliable working day for really serious analysis, because you experience assured that you will discover what you are wanting for. Dig into the earlier, since whatever you find out could raise your earnings or make you seem very good in the eyes of many others, particularly bosses, moms and dads and VIPs. You rule! Tonight: Folks discover you.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22)
★★★★★
This is a fabulous day to schmooze with other folks, due to the fact folks are joyful to see every single other. Since Mercury is dancing with blessed Jupiter, group scenarios in particular will bubble with enthusiasm. Love the firm of young individuals, if attainable. Tonight: Discover!

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
★★★★
Men and women will sit up and take notice today, particularly bosses, dad and mom and VIPs, simply because you audio like you know what you are talking about. (Generally, success is the look of achievement.) Really don’t be reluctant to run an aged thought up the flagpole to see if any individual salutes. Tonight: Check out your funds.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
★★★★★
This is a amazing working day to analyze and understand anything new. It’s also a great working day to make vacation programs. In the meantime, your skill to discover social media and publishing options is amazing. If you are involved in a club, conference or convention, men and women will pay attention to you. Tonight:

♈ ARIES

March 21 to April 20

Tonight’s moon encourages you to review all relationships and firm up – or free up – key promises. When people are truly together what’s inside is more than enough.

Keeping career hopes hidden can push supporters away, so share everything.

Passion is fiery but faithful, with so much start-over potential.

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Passion is fiery but faithful, with so much start-over potential

♉ TAURUS

April 21 to May 21

Your ability to amass and assess facts and figures is intense.

So if you’re not feeling challenged, at home or work, do seek to switch.

A name or product with an Aussie flavour can shake up your immediate future, maybe with added passion magic.

If you’re in love, make the time to send that special message.

♊ GEMINI

May 22 to June 2

Wondering and winning make a fabulous Jupiter mix, so finding out more about a person or project can boost your prize potential.

And instead of avoiding an issue, you simply start dealing with it.

Love-wise, you have a naughty streak that’s fun, fresh and wows partners. “A” names can be so lucky.

♋ CANCER

June 22 to July 22

New fortune in a family is ready to be shared with you – and grows even stronger as you incorporate your own knowledge.

This way, everyone can be enriched.

Revisiting a good health habit can redraw your future.

But take things slowly.

“S” love buzzes with mutual electricity ­– stop denying this!

♌ LEO

July 23 to August 23

When a colleague or neighbour leaves a gap in a conversation, you know how to fill it to reap romance benefits – so let your heart rule your head.

Pride at home can push out the chance of forgiveness, but you can change this by stepping out of your comfort zone.

Partners need space to think about “M”.

♍ VIRGO

August 24 to September 22

A mix of Mercury optimism and moon caution makes your success sector sing – any risks you take are well thought through.

And you can speed through a paperwork mountain.

It’s a day for love revelations as partners open up, while new love is in the air where a loyalty card is used.

♎ LIBRA

September 23 to October 23

Your creative self is the focus for so much star sparkle – and many people notice, whether or not they say so.

Taking the lead with a love partner can end uncertainty.

If you’re single, a last-minute change of meeting place or time can be your passion clue.

A friend with a new title can connect to competition luck.

♏ SCORPIO

October 24 to November 2

You’ve been keeping so much under wraps at home, now the moon shows it’s time to let it all go.

Attraction bubbles up where a toast or a project is being proposed – with a sexy voice making a speech.

When one name

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (WIFR) – The number of nonfarm jobs increased over-the-year in all 14 Illinois metropolitan areas in June according to preliminary data released today by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Illinois Department of Employment Security.

The unemployment rate decreased over-the-year in all metro areas.

The number of nonfarm jobs increased in all fourteen Illinois metropolitan areas. The metro areas which had the largest over-the-year percentage increases in total nonfarm jobs were the Springfield MSA up 7 percent, for 6,800 jobs, the Peoria MSA up 6.6 percent, for 10,200 jobs and the Lake-Kenosha IL-WI Metro, up 5.8 percent, for 22,300 jobs. Total nonfarm jobs in the Chicago Metro rose by 5.4 percent for 181,600 jobs.

The industries that saw job growth in a majority of metro areas included: Leisure and Hospitality (14 areas); Government (12 areas); Mining and Construction, Retail Trade, and Other Services (11 areas each); Transportation, Warehousing and Public Utilities (9 areas); Manufacturing, Wholesale Trade and Educational and Health Services (9 areas each); and Professional and Business Service (8 areas).

Over-the-year, the unemployment rate decreased in all 14 metropolitan areas; the metro areas with the largest unemployment rate decreases were the Elgin Metro down 7.6 points to 6.2 percent, the Peoria MSA down 7.2 points to 6.4 percent, the Rockford MSA down 7 points to 9.5 percent and the Illinois section of St. Louis MSA down 7 points to 5.7 percent. The Chicago Metro unemployment rate fell 6.5 points to 9.2 percent.

Rockford MSA

The not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased to 9.5 percent in June 2021 from 16.5 percent in June 2020. The last time the June rate was equal to or lower was in 2019 when it was 5.3 percent.

Total nonfarm employment increased 1,600 compared to June 2020.

Manufacturing went down 3,800 and professional-business services down 500 sectors, recorded employment declines over-the-year. Leisure-hospitality up 2,900, transportation-warehousing-utilities up 800 jobs, other services up 500 and government up 500 jobs had the largest payroll gains over the year.

Ogle County

The not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased to 5.9 percent in June 2021 from 11.9 percent in June 2020. The last time the June rate was equal to or lower was in 2019 when it was 4.1 percent.

Total nonfarm employment increased by 1,375 jobs over the year.

The trade-transportation-utilities down 150 jobs sector recorded the largest employment declines compared to one year ago. Construction up 700 jobs, government up 450 jobs, and leisure-hospitality up 300 jobs, had the largest payroll gains over the year.

Stephenson County

The not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased to 5.8 percent in June 2021 from 9.9 percent in June 2020. The last time the June rate was equal to or lower was in 2019 when it was 3.8 percent.

Total nonfarm employment increased by 550 over the year.

The manufacturing down 75 jobs and educational-health services down 50 jobs sector recorded the largest employment declines compared to one year ago. Leisure-hospitality added 175 jobs, government added 175 jobs

The Baton Rouge metro area has added back 18,300 jobs compared to June 2020 when more businesses were still closed in an effort to curb the spread of the coronavirus pandemic. 

The capital region had 385,100 nonfarm jobs last month, up 4.9% compared to June 2020, according to data released Friday by the Louisiana Workforce Commission. By comparison, Baton Rouge had 411,000 jobs in the region in June 2019. 

Louisiana had 1.8 million nonfarm jobs last month, 76,200 more jobs, or an uptick of 4.3% than in June 2020. 

The numbers are not seasonally adjusted and are from data compiled through surveys conducted in mid-June.

The government sector, which includes state, local and federal workers but also public school teachers, had 72,500 jobs in June, up 2,000 jobs compared to June 2020 but down from 74,300 jobs in June 2019. 

Trade, transportation and utilities hit 66,900 jobs, up 1,200 workers compared to June 2020 across the nine-parish Baton Rouge metro area which is still shy of when the area had 70,200 workers in those roles in 2019. 

Education and health services, which includes charter and private school teachers, had 53,300 jobs up 2,500 jobs compared to June 2020. That’s just short of 54,600 jobs in June 2019. 

Professional and business services had 47,600 jobs, up 1,700 jobs from one year ago which is how many jobs the region had in that sector in June 2019. 

Local construction employment reached 40,800 jobs, up 3,100 jobs compared to last year. That’s still down compared to 51,500 in June 2019. 

Leisure and hospitality had 37,200 jobs, up 6,000 compared to last year, down from 41,300 jobs in June 2019. 

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Manufacturing hit 29,200 jobs, up 200 jobs over the year, down since 30,000 jobs in June 2019. 

Financial activities employed 16,700 workers, down 200 over the year, which is also down from 18,700 in June 2019. 

Other services had 15,500 jobs, up 1,000 jobs compared to June 2020, down from 17,100 in June 2019. 

Information, which includes the motion picture industry, hit 4,800 jobs, up 900 compared to June 2020 which was the same the industry had in June 2019. 

The Baton Rouge unemployment rate, not seasonally adjusted, was 6.8% compared to 6.1% in May, and 9.5% in June 2020. Louisiana’s unemployment rate was 7.4%, compared to 10.3% last year. The U.S. unemployment rate was 6.1% compared to 11.2% in June 2020. 

NEW ORLEANS: The Crescent City metro area added 22,200 jobs with 528,600 nonfarm jobs last month, up 4.3% compared to last year. That’s still short compared to 588,300 jobs in June 2019. Trade, transportation had 103,900 jobs, up 3,700 over the year but down compared to 112,500 in June 2019. Education and health services was the second largest cluster with 102,700 jobs, up 4,200 jobs over the year and more than 101,500 in June 2019. Professional and business services had 71,700 jobs, up 4,500 over the year, but down compared

Clark County’s labor market maintained its recovery momentum in June with a seasonally adjusted net gain of 700 jobs, according to the latest report from regional economist Scott Bailey. The county added 1,400 jobs in June in unadjusted terms, for a total of 167,700 jobs.

The seasonally adjusted figure is calculated to account for routine annual ups-and-downs in employment. June’s total of 700 continues a nearly unbroken streak of job gains for Clark County in 2021. The only exception was a seasonally adjusted net loss of 300 jobs in April, which Bailey attributed in part to the volatility of the job market one year prior.

“The whole seasonal adjustment thing gets really dicey when you have a crazy thing like April of last year,” he said. “It can throw it off a little bit. But the chart shows the trend is up, at a pretty nice pace.”

Clark County’s construction sector saw the greatest gain, picking up 500 jobs in June, followed by the leisure and hospitality industry, which added 300 jobs. The trade, transportation and utilities sector and the professional and business services sector each gained about 200 jobs, and several other sectors gained or lost about 100 jobs each, according to Bailey’s report.

The county’s unemployment rate for June was estimated at 5.1 percent, slightly below the statewide figure of 5.3 percent. It’s also less than half of the figure reported a year ago for Clark County, Bailey noted. The number of unemployed residents in the county fell from 26,500 in June 2020 to 12,300 in June 2021.

July 21, 2021 10:00 a.m.

Douglas County’s payroll employers dropped a seasonally adjusted 190 jobs in June with the unemployment rate essentially unchanged.

Information from the State of Oregon Employment Department said the new rate is 6.4 percent, compared to a revised 6.5 percent rate in May.

The seasonally adjusted job loss was 40 in May and 160 in April. Regional economist Brian Rooney said Douglas County has gained back 52 percent of the jobs lost in March and April of 2002, at the onset of the COVID-19 crisis.

Rooney said in the not seasonally adjusted private-sector industries in June, leisure and hospitality gained 70 jobs, with construction and retail trade each adding 50 jobs. There was a loss of 30 jobs in private education and health services.

Government dropped 10 jobs from a loss of 70 jobs in local government that was countered by a gain of 30 each in federal and state government.

Rooney said when comparing June of 2021 with June of last year, total nonfarm employment is up 380 jobs, or 10.2 percent. Large over-the-year gains were seen with the addition of 220 jobs in local government, 150 in wholesale trade, 150 in private education and health services, and 120 in construction. There was a large loss in leisure and hospitality of 250 jobs.

Douglas County’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate is down from 9.2 percent in June of 2020. The Oregon seasonally adjusted June rate was 6.5 percent while the U.S. rate was 5.9 percent for the same month.

 

Spokane County’s non-seasonally adjusted unemployment rate fell to a pre-pandemic low of 4.8% in June as nearly every industry sector experienced job growth, according to data from the Washington state Employment Security Department.

The Spokane metropolitan statistical area, which includes Spokane, Stevens and Pend Oreille counties, added 3,400-nonfarm jobs and 3,100-private sector jobs in June, the department reported Tuesday.

The service-providing sector added the greatest number of jobs from May to June at 2,700. Those were followed by education and health services, which added 1,200 jobs.

The county remains about 1,000 jobs below the number of jobs in the area compared with June 2019, but the rate of job growth last month is staggering, said Doug Tweedy, an economist with the ESD.

“Of course, that’s compared with the pandemic and business lockdowns, but we are back to close to where we were in 2019, which was a record year for employment,” he said.

The construction, health care and social-assistance sectors each added 600 jobs last month. Retail trade added 400 jobs while leisure and hospitality added 200 jobs.

Leisure and hospitality and retail trade – which were two of the hardest-hit industries during the pandemic – are nearing economic recovery as the sectors are 2,000 jobs below pre-pandemic levels. Both industries had a combined total of 53,700 positions in June 2019.

The county’s unemployment rate was 4.6% in May of this year , but last year in June the rate had ballooned to 10.3%.

Fewer workers are filing jobless claims, signaling a bright spot for job growth in the county, Tweedy said.

“There are less people being laid off,” he said. “In fact, we are back to what we were in 2019.”

 
In a strong sign for the Las Vegas area, job growth in leisure and hospitality doubled in June compared to the previous month, according to new monthly statistics released July 25 by the Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation.


Dave Schmidt, chief economist for the state, said the food service sector is now nearly fully recovered to pre-pandemic levels with more than 131,000 workers. Food service and drinking places added 6,600 jobs since May.


That category has lagged behind most other industries, especially in the Las Vegas area where the vast majority of leisure and hospitality workers are.


The few sectors reporting job losses in June include a 7,100 decrease in government jobs, primarily seasonal reductions in education over the summer, 
according to DETR’s June economic report.

Altogether, the state added 15,400 jobs in June for a total employment of 1.336 million. That leaves 58,900 people still looking for work.

Carson City remained flat with 30,200 employed workers while Las Vegas increased total employment by 6,500 and Reno-Sparks added 800.

The unemployment rate remained stable at a seasonally adjusted 7.8% — same as May 2021 and up from June 2020’s mark of 7.6%.

Schmidt pointed out that the June numbers are the first good look at the recovery since the state relaxed business restrictions related to the pandemic.

“While June data is positive, there is still significant disruption to the economy as businesses and labor force seek to recover from the effects of the pandemic,” Schmidt said in a statement.

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Alaska had about 17,000 more jobs last month than it did in June 2020, with most industries seeing gains over that period but still falling below pre-pandemic levels, a report released Friday by the state labor department shows.

The state had about 30,600 fewer jobs last month than in June 2019, according to the report.

Industries hard-hit during 2020 saw big gains in the new report, the department said. For example, there were 4,500 more jobs in leisure and hospitality last month than a year earlier and 4,200 more in the trade, transportation and utilities sector.

However, there were 11,300 fewer jobs in leisure and hospitality last month than in June 2019 and 6,300 fewer in trade, transportation and utilities, according to the report.

Health care employment and construction were up from June 2020 and equaled their June 2019 numbers. Manufacturing, which the department said is mainly seafood processing, had 1,200 more jobs last month than a year earlier and 100 fewer than in June 2019.

Whether Alaska is in a recession “is a natural question but not one that we are focused on,” said Karinne Wiebold, a state labor department economist, in an email.

The COVID-19 pandemic “was such a singular shock to the economy that the employment effects are really not like a traditional recession. It will take a while to see if the economy rebounds from the shock in a relatively short time after the pandemic has passed, or if employment remains depressed,” she wrote. The pandemic is not over nationally or internationally, “so the economy continues to feel the pressure.”

According to the department, oil and gas was the only major sector with significantly fewer jobs last month than a year ago. The 6,200 jobs reported last month were 900 fewer than a year earlier and 3,800 fewer than in June 2019.

Wiebold said employment in oil and gas peaked in 2014, with an annual average of 14,800 jobs. As Alaska came through a recession set off by low oil prices that spanned between 2015 and 2018, the annual average for jobs in oil and gas was at 9,900, she said. Then the pandemic hit.

“At this point, it looks like we may have hit the floor, but time will tell,” she said of jobs in the sector.

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Alaska had about 17,000 more jobs last month than it did in June 2020, with most industries seeing gains over that period but still falling below pre-pandemic levels, a report released Friday by the state labor department shows.

The state had about 30,600 fewer jobs last month than in June 2019, according to the report.

Industries hard-hit during 2020 saw big gains in the new report, the department said. For example, there were 4,500 more jobs in leisure and hospitality last month than a year earlier and 4,200 more in the trade, transportation and utilities sector.

However, there were 11,300 fewer jobs in leisure and hospitality last month than in June 2019 and 6,300 fewer in trade, transportation and utilities, according to the report.

Health care employment and construction were up from June 2020 and equaled their June 2019 numbers. Manufacturing, which the department said is mainly seafood processing, had 1,200 more jobs last month than a year earlier and 100 fewer than in June 2019.

Whether Alaska is in a recession “is a natural question but not one that we are focused on,” said Karinne Wiebold, a state labor department economist, in an email.

The COVID-19 pandemic “was such a singular shock to the economy that the employment effects are really not like a traditional recession. It will take a while to see if the economy rebounds from the shock in a relatively short time after the pandemic has passed, or if employment remains depressed,” she wrote. The pandemic is not over nationally or internationally, “so the economy continues to feel the pressure.”

According to the department, oil and gas was the only major sector with significantly fewer jobs last month than a year ago. The 6,200 jobs reported last month were 900 fewer than a year earlier and 3,800 fewer than in June 2019.

Wiebold said employment in oil and gas peaked in 2014, with an annual average of 14,800 jobs. As Alaska came through a recession set off by low oil prices that spanned between 2015 and 2018, the annual average for jobs in oil and gas was at 9,900, she said. Then the pandemic hit.

“At this point, it looks like we may have hit the floor, but time will tell,” she said of jobs in the sector.